myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Climate Change
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 177, 178, 179
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Politics, Off-Topic, Opinions
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 3291

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exactly Mac. Here is a classic example.

isobars wrote:
* Don't forget that Biden rates our #1 threat as "domestic terrorists" and defines them as anyone who disagrees with the Democratic party line: Source: His own lips, on camera, to the media.


Iso only hears what he wants to hear & ignores the rest. Biden didn’t define people who disagree with the Democratic party as “domestic terrorists”, he said that those who fail to honor fair election results or those who fail to condemn the people who tried to stop a peaceful transfer of power by storming the nation’s capital are anti-democratic; and they are. You know, people like Iso.

Coachg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10348

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding domestic terrorists, there are some telling numbers from a NYT article that indicate where that kind of violence is coming from. As we all know, it is coming from the right,, but for the details I've provided the article below.


"‘Numbers don’t lie’

Over the past decade, the Anti-Defamation League has counted about 450 U.S. murders committed by political extremists.

Of these 450 killings, right-wing extremists committed about 75 percent. Islamic extremists were responsible for about 20 percent, and left-wing extremists were responsible for 4 percent.

Nearly half of the murders were specifically tied to white supremacists:

As this data shows, the American political right has a violence problem that has no equivalent on the left. And the 10 victims in Buffalo this past weekend are now part of this toll. “Right-wing extremist violence is our biggest threat,” Jonathan Greenblatt, the head of the ADL, has written. “The numbers don’t lie.”

The pattern extends to violence less severe than murder, like the Jan. 6 attack on Congress. It also extends to the language from some Republican politicians — including Donald Trump — and conservative media figures that treats violence as a legitimate form of political expression. A much larger number of Republican officials do not use this language but also do not denounce it or punish politicians who do use it; Kevin McCarthy, the top House Republican, is a leading example.

It’s important to emphasize that not all extremist violence comes from the right — and that the precise explanation for any one attack can be murky, involving a mixture of ideology, mental illness, gun access and more. In the immediate aftermath of an attack, people are sometimes too quick to claim a direct cause and effect. But it is also incorrect to pretend that right-wing violence and left-wing violence are equivalent problems.

Fears in Washington

If you talk to members of Congress and their aides these days — especially off the record — you will often hear them mention their fears of violence being committed against them.

Some Republican members of Congress have said that they were reluctant to vote for Trump’s impeachment or conviction partly because of the threats against other members who had already denounced him. House Republicans who voted for President Biden’s infrastructure bill also received threats. Democrats say their offices receive a spike in phone calls and online messages threatening violence after they are criticized on conservative social media or cable television shows.

People who oversee elections report similar problems. “One in six elec­tion offi­cials have exper­i­enced threats because of their job,” the Brennan Center, a research group, reported this year. “Ranging from death threats that name offi­cials’ young chil­dren to racist and gendered harass­ment, these attacks have forced elec­tion offi­cials across the coun­try to take steps like hiring personal secur­ity, flee­ing their homes, and putting their chil­dren into coun­sel­ing.”

There is often overlap between these violent threats and white supremacist beliefs. White supremacy tends to treat people of color as un-American or even less than fully human, views that can make violence seem justifiable. The suspect in the Buffalo massacre evidently posted an online manifesto that discussed replacement theory, a racial conspiracy theory that Tucker Carlson promotes on his Fox News show.

“History has taught us that what begins with words ends in far worse,” Representative Liz Cheney, one of the few Republicans who have repeatedly and consistently denounced violence and talk of violence from the right, wrote on Twitter yesterday. “The House GOP leadership has enabled white nationalism, white supremacy, and antisemitism,” Cheney wrote, and called on Republican leaders to “renounce and reject these views and those who hold them.”

A few other Republicans, like Senator Mitt Romney, have taken a similar stance. But many other prominent Republicans have taken a more neutral stance or even embraced talk of violence.

Some have spoken openly about violence as a legitimate political tool — and not just Trump, who has done so frequently.

At the rally that preceded the Jan. 6 attack, Representative Mo Brooks suggested the crowd should “start taking down names and kicking ass.” Before she was elected to Congress, Marjorie Taylor Greene supported the idea of executing Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi and other top Democrats. Representative Paul Gosar once posted an animated video altered to depict himself killing Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and swinging swords at Biden.

Rick Perry, a former Texas governor, once called the Federal Reserve “treasonous” and talked about treating its chairman “pretty ugly.” During Greg Gianforte’s campaign for Montana’s House seat, he went so far as to assault a reporter who asked him a question he didn’t like; Gianforte won and has since become Montana’s governor.

These Republicans have received no meaningful sanction from their party. McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House, has been especially solicitous of Brooks and other members who use violent imagery.

This Republican comfort with violence is new. Republican leaders from past decades, like Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole, Howard Baker and the Bushes, did not evoke violence.

“In a stable democracy,” Steven Levitsky, a Harvard political scientist, told me, “politicians unambiguously reject violence and unambiguously expel from their ranks antidemocratic forces.”"


Unfortunately, there is a graph in the article that didn't print out, but fortunately, the basic numbers are repeated elsewhere in the text.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17110
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chandler. I guarantee you that Isobars will not read this article. According to him, all violence started with Black Lives Matter.

Last edited by mac on Fri May 20, 2022 4:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10348

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2022 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite honestly, I don't expect isobars to ever change his mind. He's way too deep into right wing nonsense to see the facts. The road to the truth is something that he will never find. Even if he was to unwittingly stumble upon it, he would be unwilling to accept and embrace it publicly.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAS



Joined: 18 Feb 1997
Posts: 135
Location: planet earth

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2022 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
Quite honestly, I don't expect isobars to ever change his mind. He's way too deep into right wing nonsense to see the facts. The road to the truth is something that he will never find. Even if he was to unwittingly stumble upon it, he would be unwilling to accept and embrace it publicly.


You are so right. Several days ago in the thread titled “Inflation and immigration” I called him out his posting claiming that lots of infant formula is going to migrants at the border. I posted my research on the subject and invited him to prove me wrong. Instead, he just ignored me and posted nothing. He is too weak to ever admit he was wrong. He claims he never lies but he regularly posts things that he may believe are true but are still just lies.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Politics, Off-Topic, Opinions All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 177, 178, 179
Page 179 of 179

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group