myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
thrusters, harness lines and crabbing/cavitating
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Northwest USA & Canada
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
grantmac017



Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 937

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stock fins should be plenty especially a 20cm rear, it's a technique adjustment that has to be made.
Goya boards do benefit from some toe on the fronts which if you want can be adjusted by sanding the fin heads, one of the benefits of mini tuttle thrusters. Or just buy K4 3 degree Ezzys from Chinook.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 8688
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nada wrote:
I went through the same adaptive process, but it was lack of planing rather than crabbing that was the issue and I'm an old skool "back footer."

I combined several of the above recs: longer lines, higher boom placement, longer center fin (2/3 cm over stock), shorter side bites (1/2 cm under stock) and it worked.

My read is that the fin swap made the biggest difference as I did this on my wife's board and she noticed the improvement right away and she's far from technical.

Agree with SurferSteve above on stock multi-fin configurations - they all seem overly "skatey" to me out of the box. If you look at the old Real Wind's or Brian's Open Oceans, they all came with bigger skegs and shorter side bites. You didn't note what volume your Goya was, but I'm running a 21 + 10s on a 94 liter, so maybe boost the center to start?

K4s (Chinook sells em) are solid and a cheap way to mess around while you dial this in - good luck!


Definitely a different ride than the old RW style tri-fin, but better IMO. The "skatey" feeling you reference is the one I personally seek. If you think the One is "skatey", you should try the Goya quad on a good Wall day. I still ride the Goya One , single fin, and on big days I try to ride a smaller fin(20-21) to keep it in the water and retain the looseness. The RW 72 ltr Fish is a board I still ride as well and its almost too fast , and rigid compared to today's offerings...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20282

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 4:16 pm    Post subject: Re: thrusters, harness lines and crabbing/cavitating Reply with quote

jgda wrote:
Some have recommended to not lean out with the longer lines, but bend my knees to get weight on the harness lines, but then that feels like a lot of pressure on my legs and does not feel natural. Plus it is exhausting.


WAY back when, a rule of thumb I quickly adapted was, "If my legs tire early, my boom is too low. Arms tire early, my boom is too high." Of course, one has to adjust for the effects of harness line length and hook height, but the bottom line is to let your harness, and thus mast foot, carry more of the load. It's less tiring, it weights the nose more for earlier planing and less (not zero, just less; boards crab) crabbing. Once you get used to that, riding swell and flying downwind while hooked in follow suit and extend session length very significantly.

As for harness line length, I use extensive and repeated trial and error and my own dynamic ergonomics rather than elbows, fingers, and others' edicts to determine my optimal harness line length.

GarryW wrote:
I've been fighting with the new design boards for three years now and I continue to struggle with it [regarding planing].


Ditto, regarding just sailing the dang things in crooked lines. However, I don't struggle with them; life's too short. I demo them, remain completely unimpressed, put 'em back on the lawn, and grab something I absolutely love from my own quiver. If it ain't broke ...

I have and love some of the earlier pioneer stubbies, but just don't like the recent extremes. One highly regarded sailor at a major shop asked me, "Do you want to start from scratch and learn all over how to sail these sawed-off wonders, or just keep on having fun and improving your skills?"

I said, "I'm 75. There's no way I'm going to waste a precious remaining season of fun in the hope of gaining a little bit of -- if any -- performance and I sure as hell don't want to have to look down to see what kind of board I'm on today every time I jibe or slash." I LOVE back foot sailing's benefits!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
H2OJoe



Joined: 20 Aug 2002
Posts: 87

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Newer boards (they've been around quite awhile now) require a more upright stance and more vertical boom pressure versus the old hiked out style. At your height your boom should be close, if not at the top of the boom opening on your sail. Likewise your weight is more over the board and balanced between both feet. These boards require you to get in the front strap sooner to plane. If you can adjust to the new board it will be easier than your old board(s), plane sooner and have greater wind range. Most of the naysayers are just reluctant to change. Remember, one step back for two steps forward. Aloha!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vientomas



Joined: 25 Apr 2000
Posts: 2093

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

“once you stop learning you start dying”

― Albert Einstein
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2410
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been dying since I was about 23.

-Craig Goudie

p.s. never stopped learning though

vientomas wrote:
“once you stop learning you start dying”

― Albert Einstein
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
vientomas



Joined: 25 Apr 2000
Posts: 2093

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cgoudie1 wrote:
I've been dying since I was about 23.

-Craig Goudie

p.s. never stopped learning though

vientomas wrote:
“once you stop learning you start dying”

― Albert Einstein


Thanks for the laugh Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20282

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I began dying about 10:35 AM on Dec 12, 1942, according to my birth certificate.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
biffmalibu



Joined: 30 May 2008
Posts: 505

PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2021 11:41 am    Post subject: New board? Ditch the harness lines, ditch the straps. Reply with quote

All boards are different. No board does everything well.

When you get a new board, you need to get to know it! Play around with it, powered up. Don't hook in and commence blasting, expecting magical perfection. And don't expect to like it with your regular style. YOU have to adapt to the board (and the conditions). The board (and fins) will never adapt to you.

Trust your arms, relax your legs, use the swell. Make a lot of turns, close the gap and cruise, walk the board, hop, etc. If you expect to test a board by hooking in and getting in the straps right away, you will hate every new board. Also, forgeting about the lines and straps will make you a better windsurfer.


Last edited by biffmalibu on Tue Jun 15, 2021 1:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10102

PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2021 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not feeling immediately comfortable with a new board is a bad sign, and in my experience, little can be done to turn a less than satisfactory board into a winner assuming that you're a competent sailor. Just because a board is new, looks great and is from a well known and respected brand, doesn't necessarily mean that its a good design that will perform well. I think that we all know that the market can be littered with duds in the mix.

However, your choice of the right fin or fin combination can make a world of difference. I'm of the mind that bigger fins can let you sort things out quickly, especially when it comes to light wind performance. While some folks may want the greater maneuverability that smaller fins can provide, some testing with larger fins can uncover whether a board has what it takes to be a performer. Also, it's important to keep in mind that sails and fins must be a good match. Often a large sail range for a board can mean a multiple fin range too to get the most of things.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Northwest USA & Canada All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group