myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Windsurf Wind Range for Various Size Sail
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3900

PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marcelo,

To see what is available today in the way of sails, go to:

http://www.mauisails.com/index.php?what=sails

This range of sails is pretty normal for the larger manufacturers. There are lots of other brands that have typical line ups. There are links on this site to see how to rig the sails which will allow you to see a video to get a better look at the sails.

Tell us more about your skills:

Volume of small board you have sailed?
Your body weight
Water starts?
Carving Gybes?
Percentage of Gybes made?
Stronger winds you can manage?
Winds you will most likely sail in?

For most of us inland sailors, we need two or three boards to sail in most conditions.

Light winds less than 10 knots - long board

Medium winds between 10 and 20 knots - 110 to 140 liters depending on body weight.

Strong winds over 20 knots - 80 to 120 liters depending on body weight.

Boards have change somewhat over the last 10 years, basically wider and shorter. Not necessarily better, but a little more stable and plane a little earlier than older boards of similar volumes. The biggest change is for the beginners and novice sailors since they have wider more stable platforms which makes it easier to learn. Once you are an intermediate sailor on smaller boards, the old boards (10-15 years old) still function pretty well as long as they are still in good condition.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DelCarpenter



Joined: 06 Nov 2008
Posts: 489
Location: Cedar Falls, IA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Marcelo1971,
In Minnesota check out http://www.lakawa.com/
They are mostly getting ready for snow or ice kiting in this season but on the website there is some help for windsurfers and you can post questions on their community chat. You might be able to find someone who lives relatively near Bemidji.

Also check out the MOWIND website, http://www.mowind.org/wp/ and the MOWIND forum on Yahoo, http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/mowind/

If you want to "sail" with a windsurfing rig in Minnesota in the winter on snow or ice you will need a toboggan or snowboard. When you don't have snow or ice you can use a long skateboard (land sailor or mountain board) if you have a large parking lot. (Any of those also require a very serious helmet plus protective gear for your elbows & knees.)

If you type delcarpenter and then the "@" symbol and then type cfu.net you will be able to send emails to me directly.

I also recommend using Roger Jackson on Starboard's "Start Windsurfing Forum" http://www.star-board.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=11
Using the old threads on that forum could also teach you a lot. And watch all of the windsurfing videos you can find on YouTube.

The "leach" system you mentioned is called a harness. Learning to use one in high wind is very tricky so starting in much milder wind will help you figure out how to use one.

Describing the equipment completely as possible the equipment you have used will help anyone trying to answer your questions. Which boards have you used (if possible list the brand, model name, & liters of volume size)?
Knowing your weight is very helpful too since a difference of 25 lbs might change whether a board could be good for you in a particular wind range.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 981
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 12:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Windsurf Wind Range for Various Size Sail Reply with quote

steve8650 wrote:
I am looking at getting into the sport but want to understand what the wind range is for different size sails and my weight. I want to see how often I will be able to get out on the water

I am going to be looking at sailing on lake Michigan and inland lakes.

I weigh 180lbs. What is the right wind range for a 5.0 and 6.0 sail?

Thanks.


As a very general rule of thumb, I'd say you'd be looking at using a 6.0 in mid-teens to low 20's and a 5.0 in the upper teens to mid 20's. This is for planing, in the foot straps sailing (intermediate to advanced windsurfing). However, from the sound of it, you're a total beginner, so you will be starting out doing non-planing sailing while working on the basics. In this case, you'd probably use the 6.0 in 5 to 15mph and the 5.0 in the 10 to 20mph range until you feel comfortable. You may even choose to use a 5.0 for all your sailing initially. With more experience, you will learn which sails work for you in any given conditions.

You should really talk to some locals - either a nearby shop, a windsurfing instructor, or windsurfers at your hometown beach to get an idea of what people commonly use in your area. Sail range is highly dependant on the age of the sail (in general, new designs, from the late 90's onwards, have a much larger range than older designs) as well as the style of the sail (race sails have a much different useable range than wave sails). Sailor size and skill is also a major factor in defining the useable range of a sail.

sm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scargo



Joined: 19 May 2007
Posts: 394

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course it all depends on your budget, but I'd recommend getting just one good-quality sail--a 5.0 or 5.5--to start. You'll learn a lot, regardless of the wind strength, and in the meantime you can figure out how much larger you want your next sail to be. But you won't "outgrow" the 5.0 or 5.5, you'll get years of use out of it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
marcelo1971



Joined: 24 Nov 2011
Posts: 3
Location: Bemidji, MN

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2011 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok so here goes my history and info, I am 5'9", 155 lbs, I begin with a very long board using the center fin, and a 6.0 sail. I used this maybe 10 times, then I tried a small board maybe 7' or 8' and a 7.0 sail, that sail was tooooo heavy, then i finished using the small board 7 or 8' with the 6.0 sail, I watched videos and the new boards look like round tip, and wider, the board I am using is thick profile but thinner, looks like a surfboard. I may have no more than 15 times in a board, and I can navigate back and for, max wind maybe was 25-30 mph and I had good fast riding a couple of times. i think I learned the basic very fast, but again a have surfing background. Now I want to invest in a EQ that will allow me to go fast and jump. Thanks guys
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3900

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marcelo,

There is no easy answer. However, based on your information, I assume that you are probably not in the foot straps, are not water starting and your "25-30" wind is probably more likely 10-20. Even an expert on a 6 meter sail at your weight would get hammered in 25-30 mph winds.

Lake sailing means variable, gusty winds, which means that you will plane and you will slog, plus having a board with enough volume that you can uphaul can be a real plus if you are a novice/intermediate sailor.

With that said, you should be looking for a "freeride" board no smaller than 90-100 liters (up to 110 is a possibility), no more than 8 years old. Older board are fine, but thicker and narrower, which means they are less stable at slow speeds and while slogging. Once planing, most perform really well, but there are some older boards 10+ years that look great, but are very difficult to sail and gybe (old style race boards).

At your weight, a 6 meter sail on a 100 liter board should plane at around 15-18 mph winds. 20 mph winds should give you a very fast ride. Over 22 and the sail will be too big.

I weigh 167 lbs and on a 105 liter board I use a 6.0 sail between 20 & 25 mph winds; a 5.2 between 22-26; a 4.5 between 25-30; a 4.0 over 30. I have been windsurfing for 27 years. I also change to an 80 liter board when I am on my 4.5 and 4.0.

Your best education is to find local windsurfers and talk to them, look at their gear and ask a lot of questions. These forums will help, but also try to find a shop and talk to the dealers. There is a lot of good used gear available, but you have to be pretty knowledgeable to avoid getting ripped off. Most windsurfers are pretty good about matching gear to the buyers skills, but not all. If you find a board, before you buy, check it out on this or other forums to learn if it is a good board for you.

Good luck
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DelCarpenter



Joined: 06 Nov 2008
Posts: 489
Location: Cedar Falls, IA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marcelo1971, whether the wind is strong enough to sail when you have time to sail can be the most important factor. There will be a lot of days in June through August in the upper midwest when the top wind speed is less than 12 mph. On those days you'll only have a dreary slog unless you have a longboard or a formula board. And the formula board would require 9.0 or larger sails with their more expensive masts and booms.

Even on days with winds above 15 mph I think sailors in the midwest use larger boards than coastal sailors because we have much larger fluctuations within 30 minutes than the coasts. For your shortboard I think you'll be happier most of the time with something in the 130 to 145 ltr range.

And I think you need a longboard as part of your solution, because of the summer frequency of light wind days, unless you are willing to not windsurf during one third or more of your summertime opportunities.

Either way wetsuit gear to extend your season in both the spring and fall is also quite important. Look at the windsurfing pictures on the LAKAWA website and notice the cold weather conditions in many or most of the speed and jumping pictures. http://www.lakawa.com/community/gallery/photo.html

If you want to do it all, and if windsurfing when and where you want to is more important than always going fast or jumping, then a Kona One Design is a good one board solution. At this time your posts sound like going fast or jumping is more important so my recommendation is for a larger shortboard as mentioned above and for also getting a longboard for our midwestern light wind days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3900

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, I also agree with Del. As I said, there is no easy answer. Earlier I said that many of us will have three boards to cover lake sailing conditions, but my most recent post was for "the small board" and higher winds which I think you were talking about.

If this small board is your only board, your sailing time would be very limited. I think Del's 130 - 140 liter option is good if you go the "one" board route, but it will be too big in winds over 20 mph and WAY too big for winds over 25 mph. Water state or "waves/chop" will play a big role in how well the big boards sail in windy conditions.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ittiandro



Joined: 22 Nov 2009
Posts: 265

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2020 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What wind range will a 5.3 m sail cover?( HSM, older model , from the 90's )

I weigh 190 lbs and sail on a 12 ft Windsup with daggerboard. I know the basics ( jibe, tack) I sail in 15 knts winds, no planing with a oldish NP Garda 6.3 m. The Garda has a surprisingly wide range up to 15-16 knts, but it is more than I can handle at 18 knts or so, even with an all-out outhaul. This is why I was thinking of adding a smaller sail to my quiver, may be a 5.3. Will it get me going with 18 knts or does it cover only the 20+ knts, perhaps too small for the 18 knts range?

Thanks

Ittiandro
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2381
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2020 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greetings Ittiandro,

You might consider a new thread rather than posting in one that's 9
years old, you might get more responses that way.

I'm not sure that I understand. Your 6.3 doesn't plane you up in 15 knot
winds, but is too hard to control in 18 knot winds (that's a pretty small
wind range, but you say it has a "wide" wind range). Are you trying to
avoid planning? If so, I'd think a much smaller sail in the 4.7 range would
be a better choice. A 12ft wind SUP isn't that easy to get planed up, and
you certainly don't want that daggerboard in use while you are planed up,
but....here's what I know at my 185 lb weight.

With 20 MPH winds(18 knots) I can plane up a 100 ltr shortboard
with a 5.2 Northwave sail (Featherlight). I haven't had any
experience with 90s sails since the 90s ( I rode HSM AWOLs back then),
but 90s sails tend to have more grunt
than modern sails, so I'm thinking 18 knots will plane you up with
a 5.3 if that wind SUP isn't too heavy, and you're not using the
dagger board.

If your intent is to plane up and have some control, a 12 ft wind SUP
is lot of board to control in 20MPH winds, but doable.

-Craig



ittiandro wrote:
What wind range will a 5.3 m sail cover?( HSM, older model , from the 90's )

I weigh 190 lbs and sail on a 12 ft Windsup with daggerboard. I know the basics ( jibe, tack) I sail in 15 knts winds, no planing with a oldish NP Garda 6.3 m. The Garda has a surprisingly wide range up to 15-16 knts, but it is more than I can handle at 18 knts or so, even with an all-out outhaul. This is why I was thinking of adding a smaller sail to my quiver, may be a 5.3. Will it get me going with 18 knts or does it cover only the 20+ knts, perhaps too small for the 18 knts range?

Thanks

Ittiandro
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group