myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
thrusters, harness lines and crabbing/cavitating
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Northwest USA & Canada
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2395
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2021 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am in agreement with Biff, and Steve. You should give a board a chance,
if it doesn't immediately give you a good ride, and I usually give them a
good 8-10 days before I turn them around, but...……………. I've also had
boards that were pretty darned rideable right out of the box. Boards by
Jeff Bailey, Mistral, Goya, and especially Brian Hinde's modern shapes,
were all like old friends after just a few minutes on them. The interesting
thing about that, is that those very designers/manufacturers can be hated
by someone else, so it's very personal, (and kinesthetic).

The 1st thing I try when I'm not comfortable with a board's ride (if I'm
not overpowered) is a larger center skeg. Resolves my issues more often than it doesn't.

-Craig

swchandler wrote:
Not feeling immediately comfortable with a new board is a bad sign, and in my experience, little can be done to turn a less than satisfactory board into a winner assuming that you're a competent sailor. Just because a board is new, looks great and is from a well known and respected brand, doesn't necessarily mean that its a good design that will perform well. I think that we all know that the market can be littered with duds in the mix.

However, your choice of the right fin or fin combination can make a world of difference. I'm of the mind that bigger fins can let you sort things out quickly, especially when it comes to light wind performance. While some folks may want the greater maneuverability that smaller fins can provide, some testing with larger fins can uncover whether a board has what it takes to be a performer. Also, it's important to keep in mind that sails and fins must be a good match. Often a large sail range for a board can mean a multiple fin range too to get the most of things.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
SynergyRehab



Joined: 05 Apr 2000
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2021 2:27 pm    Post subject: Thrusters, etc. Reply with quote

JGDA: Great forum suggestions so far, and a way to engage a bit during this relatively-weird spring. Interestingly, I now ride Surfersteve's old Goya One 78 ltr. Thruster, usually from 3.7 on-down, but it also works on powered 4.2 pretty well with the stock 20/10 cm fins. If you have a smaller board, might be too small for your height/weight (?); if in the 78+ ltr. range same ideas prob pertain below. These are merely suggestions, but have turned boards from dogs into the "never leave at home" category:
1) Shorten harness lines: I'm 6'0"/190lb and use 22" lines spaced one shaka apart; this will avoid raising boom too high and/or a hiked-out stance.
2) Avoid fin back + mast track fwd to their limits. Not much adjustment in the main fin, but center-fwd seemingly a better idea for your issue.
3) Swapping to a bit larger fin for your weight (if >200#) good easy first idea, although go too far and it may mask the real issue, drive you more upwind, as well as negate the balance between a 20/10 cm Tri Fin ratio; may need to go 23/12 or so.
4) Mast track also pushed to center-fwd position; mine is 3/4 fwd in box; again not much adjustment, but coupled with #5 below works great. Old boards had the track way fwd, so this is counter-intuitive with newer designs and crabbing upwind deal.
5) Move straps fwd/apart; mine are at most-fwd holes. This gets you into the "front seat" and into the board's planing core, pushing a bit downwind. One way to find the sweet spot for YOUR distance apart is to jump off a short step landing into "athletic" position, then measure ball of foot center-center (mine is 24-") and set your straps close to that distance.
6) If helpful, here are my measurements from tail (Rounded Pin) to center of straps: Rear = 12 1/2", Fronts = 36", Mast Track = 51 3/4"
The disclaimer: This set-up is for turning, and commonly you'll find me working hard to get upwind if not powered, so grain of salt deal here. Hope it helps, enjoy the ride.
[/i]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jgda



Joined: 19 Jul 1999
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2021 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to all for the help. I so appreciate this forum. I am 6’3 and probably weigh 190 on the water and I think I am a pretty decent sailor after all these years. I now think I need some time on the water. I will report back. Side note—- I need a bit of surgery on my left knee for a complex meniscus tear from last day of skiing in march but I am hoping to be back on the water by mid to late july. arg…not happy…hopefully, they do not take too much out…can’t be repaired unless ortho sees something different when he is in there (vs mri). I might actually get out before surgery but I do not want to tear anything further!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 8607
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2021 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's why its a great sport still. (1)Short lines, and lower boom height? The complete opposite of the trend of the past decade. Everybody must find their own sweet spot. I love the long lines, and high boom--gives me power , and space to slash while hooked in.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2395
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2021 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greetings jgda,
We could be twins! Good luck with your knee. While windsurfing
(or skiing, or biking...……..) I wear a brace on my knee (when it's acting up).

-Craig (6'3" and 190 lbs with a wet wetsuit on, and at least a competent sailor)

p.s. I like long lines and a high boom (not always easy at 6'3")

jgda wrote:
Thanks to all for the help. I so appreciate this forum. I am 6’3 and probably weigh 190 on the water and I think I am a pretty decent sailor after all these years. I now think I need some time on the water. I will report back. Side note—- I need a bit of surgery on my left knee for a complex meniscus tear from last day of skiing in march but I am hoping to be back on the water by mid to late july. arg…not happy…hopefully, they do not take too much out…can’t be repaired unless ortho sees something different when he is in there (vs mri). I might actually get out before surgery but I do not want to tear anything further!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Northwest USA & Canada All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
Page 3 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group