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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10058

PostPosted: Sun May 16, 2021 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bard, let me finish that for you.

"This is just the beginning of more nonsense from Donald Trump Republicans."
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1304

PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

real-human wrote:
MalibuGuru wrote:
Maricopa County (AZ) officials have already admitted they don't have the router passwords. They are not in charge of the election. That's illegal. Michigan officials are admitting the exact same thing now!


when Russian troll malibu barfie talks a stench comes out...

thats why paper ballots are so important to have. and they were checked two times...

you low to no level thinker.


Ahhh...but the paper ballots contain bamboo grasshopper!!!
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1304

PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MalibuGuru wrote:
Maricopa County (AZ) officials have already admitted they don't have the router passwords. They are not in charge of the election. That's illegal. Michigan officials are admitting the exact same thing now!


Perhaps like tens of thousands of other government users they outsource their telecoms and IT and hence do not have or need the passwords.
That doesn't make them "not in charge" of the elections.
Ditto for Michigan.

It really sounds like the majority of the bullcrap I hear from conspiracy addicts. They make statements that are not untrue, it's just that the statements have nothing to do with the integrity of the election.

Agent Orange claims "seals were broken on the boxes that hold the votes, ballots are missing, and worse... Holy cow, he'll be back in the White House any day now!!! NOT!


Last edited by wsurfer on Tue May 18, 2021 6:58 am; edited 3 times in total
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real-human



Joined: 02 Jul 2011
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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/republican-congressman-calls-out-bogus-claims-by-gop-colleagues-downplaying-capitol-riot/ar-BB1gN1mS?ocid=uxbndlbingoff&li=BBnbfcLFred Upton: Republican congressman calls out 'bogus' claims by GOP colleagues downplaying Capitol riot
[/b]

Quote:
Ex-Trump Adviser Alyssa Farah Explains Why She Would Never Vote for Him…


Republican Rep. Fred Upton on Sunday called out an effort by some of his GOP colleagues to downplay the Capitol insurrection, saying their "bogus" claims about the deadly attack are evidence of a need to establish a bipartisan commission to investigate the incident.


"It's absolutely bogus. You know, I was there. I watched a number of the folks walk down to the White House and then back. I have a balcony on my office. So I saw them go down. I heard the noise -- the flash bangs, I smelled some of the gas as it moved my way," the Michigan congressman told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" when asked about comments made by several congressional Republicans last week who attempted to re-write what happened on January 6.


The comments from the longtime congressman come as a rift in his party grows between members who are offering an inaccurate account of the insurrection and those who have consistently condemned the violence on January 6 while also casting blame on former President Donald Trump and his 2020 election lies for the attack. Upton was among the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for his role in inciting the riot.

Among the claims made last week was one by Rep. Andrew Clyde, a Republican from Georgia, who falsely compared the riot to a tourist visit, saying during a hearing on the attack that "there was no insurrection and to call it an insurrection, in my opinion, is a bald-faced lie."

Upton told Bash he wasn't sure what was motivating his colleagues to make such claims, but that those statements stand as a reason why he supports a bipartisan commission to investigate the attack. Lawmakers on Friday cleared a hurdle on Friday in creating a bipartisan commission after the top Democrat and Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee struck a deal on how to structure the independent panel.

"Get the facts out, try to assure the American public this is what happened, and let the facts lead us to the conclusion," Upton said.


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/a-republican-congressman-who-denied-there-was-an-insurrection-and-likened-capitol-rioters-to-tourists-was-photographed-barricading-the-chamber-doors-against-them/ar-BB1gP5O3?li=BBorjTa&ocid=uxbndlbingoff


A Republican congressman who denied there was an insurrection and likened Capitol rioters to tourists was photographed barricading the chamber doors against them

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real-human



Joined: 02 Jul 2011
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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/doj-says-capitol-rioter-carried-semi-auto-handgun-after-republicans-claim-they-werent-armed/ar-BB1gQl5d?ocid=uxbndlbingoff&li=BBnb7Kz


DOJ Says Capitol Rioter Carried Semi-Auto Handgun After Republicans Claim They Weren't Armed


Quote:
Palm Beach County prosecutor says Florida governor can't stop Trump…
Paul Ryan excoriates planned GOP effort to challenge Biden's Electoral…

Despite claims by Republican congressmen that the January 6 Capitol rioters didn't carry firearms, an indictment from the Department of Justice (DOJ) has alleged that one rioter did carry a "semi-automatic handgun" in the building during the riots.

a person standing in front of a building: Despite Republicans saying that the January 6 riots were not an "armed insurrection," a rioter named Chris Alberts has been indicted for carrying a "semi-automatic handgun" in the Capitol building during the riots. In this photo, Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC.© Brent Stirton/Getty Despite Republicans saying that the January 6 riots were not an "armed insurrection," a rioter named Chris Alberts has been indicted for carrying a "semi-automatic handgun" in the Capitol building during the riots. In this photo, Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC.
The DOJ indictment accuses defendant Christopher Alberts of carrying a Taurus G2C semi-automatic handgun on Capitol grounds on January 6. The indictment also says he had a "large capacity ammunition feeding device."

The indictment's charges accuse Alberts of engaging in physical violence, entering and causing "disorderly and disruptive conduct" in a restricted building with a deadly weapon as well as possessing the weapon unlawfully. Alberts also stands accused of committing civil disorder and assaulting and resisting a police officer.

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Despite the arrest and others like it, at least two Republicans have suggested that firearms weren't a part of the January 6 Capitol riots.


Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson has said the event "didn't seem like an armed insurrection."

"The fact of the matter is, this didn't seem like an armed insurrection, to me," Johnson said in a mid-February interview with WISN. "When you hear of armed, don't you think of firearms?"

"Here's the question I would've liked to ask [at former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial]," Johnson continued. "How many firearms were confiscated? I'm only aware of one. If that was a planned armed insurrection, you really have a bunch of idiots."

Johnson has pushed the disproven conspiracy theory that anti-fascist "Antifa" protestors were involved in the insurrection. He has also said he would've been more afraid for his safety if the rioters had been members of the racial justice protest group Black Lives Matter.

Johnson isn't alone in his assumption that the insurrection wasn't armed. Republican Texas Representative Louie Gohmert has also made similar comments.

"There's no evidence ... that this was an armed insurrection. Armed meaning with firearms," Gohmert said in a House floor speech on May 14. "There were no firearms. Not one person has been charged with bringing a firearm to the Capitol ... no one brought a gun into this building."

During Gohmert's speech, he accused the FBI of "unfairly" targeting supporters of Republican former President Donald Trump. He also accused the DOJ under Democratic President Joe Biden of "criminalizing ... only political protests by Republicans or conservatives."

At least 15 people have been charged with carrying a deadly or dangerous weapon during the Capitol riots, according to NPR's database of charges.

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real-human



Joined: 02 Jul 2011
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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/gop-led-maricopa-county-board-decries-election-recount-a-sham/ar-BB1gQsN2?li=BB141NW3&ocid=uxbndlbingoff


GOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham'


Quote:
he Republican-led Maricopa County Board of Supervisors condemned the state Senate's GOP-led audit of the county's 2020 election results as a "sham" in a letter Monday.

a sign on the side of a road: GOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham'© Getty Images GOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham'
In a letter to GOP senators announcing that the board will cease all cooperation with the GOP state senators' efforts, the board accused state senators of allowing Arizona to become a "laughingstock" as they pursued discredited, false claims of election fraud perpetrated by former President Trump.


"You are photographing ballots contrary to the laws that the Senate helped enact, and you are sending those images to unidentified places and people. You have repeatedly lost control of your Twitter account, which has tweeted things that appear to be the rantings of a petulant child-not the serious statements of a serious audit," wrote the board.

"I will not be responding to any more requests from this sham process. Finish your audit and be ready to defend what you're finding in a court of law," added Chairman Jack Sellers (R) at Monday's meeting of the board, according to The Washington Post.

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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16385
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2021 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bard's kind of madness.

Quote:

By Jennifer Morrell
Jennifer Morrell, a former local election official and national expert on post-election audits, is a partner at The Elections Group.
May 19, 2021 at 3:00 a.m. PDT
When Arizona’s secretary of state asked me whether I would serve as an observer of the Arizona Senate’s audit of Maricopa County’s ballots, I anticipated that I would see some unusual things. Post-election audits and recounts are almost always conducted under the authority of local election officials, who have years of knowledge and experience. The idea of a government handing over control of ballots to an outside group, as the state Senate did when hiring a Florida contractor with no elections experience, was bizarre. This firm, Cyber Ninjas, insisted that it would recount and examine all 2.1 million ballots cast in the county in the 2020 general election.

So I expected it to be unconventional. But it was so much worse than that. In more than a decade working on elections, audits and recounts across the country, I’ve never seen one this mismanaged.

I counted votes in Michigan. There’s no way to commit fraud.

I arrived at the Veterans Memorial Coliseum on the morning of May 4. Security was conspicuously high: At three stations, guards checked my ID and my letter from the secretary of state. No bags were permitted on the floor, and I had to surrender my phone, laptop and smartwatch. I was allowed a yellow legal pad and red pen to take notes, and provided with a pink T-shirt to wear so I would be immediately identifiable. The audit observers hired by Cyber Ninjas, in orange T-shirts, followed me wherever I went and reported random things about me they found suspicious. Several times someone asked to test my pen, to ensure it really had red ink. Once, they even demanded that I empty my pockets, in which I carried that pen and a pair of reading glasses. I was allowed only to ask procedural questions of the Cyber Ninjas attorney; I couldn’t talk to anyone else performing the work. The atmosphere was tense.

I was stunned to see spinning conveyor wheels, whizzing hundreds of ballots past “counters,” who struggled to mark, on a tally sheet, each voter’s selection for the presidential and Senate races. They had only a few seconds to record what they saw. Occasionally, I saw a counter look up, realize they missed a ballot and then grab the wheel to stop it. This process sets them up to make so many mistakes, I kept thinking. Humans are terrible at tedious, repetitive tasks; we’re especially bad at counting. That’s why, in all the other audits I’ve seen, bipartisan teams follow a tallying method that allows for careful review and inspection of each ballot, followed by a verification process. I’d never seen an audit use contraptions to speed up the process.

Speed doesn’t necessarily pose a problem if the audit has a process for catching and correcting mistakes. But it didn’t. Each table had three volunteers tallying the ballots, and their tally sheets were considered “done” as long as two of the three tallies matched, and the third was off by no more than two ballots. The volunteers only recounted if their tally sheets had three or more errors — a threshold they stuck to, no matter how many ballots a stack contained, whether it was 50 or 100. This allowed for a shocking amount of error. Some table managers told the counters to go back and recount when there were too many errors; other table managers just instructed the counters to fix their “math mistakes.” At no point did anyone track how many ballots they were processing at their station, to ensure that none got added or lost during handling.

'Where does this end?': Arizona is still auditing its 2020 election results
More than six months after the 2020 presidential election, Arizona Senate Republicans are leading an audit of the 2.1 million ballots cast in Maricopa County. (Erin Patrick O'Connor/The Washington Post)
A political litmus test for Republicans: Fail it, lose your TV slot

I also observed other auditors working on a “forensic paper audit,” flagging ballots as “suspicious” for a variety of reasons. One was presidential selection: If someone thought the voter’s choice looked as though it was marked by a machine, they flagged it as “anomalous.” Another was “missing security markers.” (It’s virtually impossible for a ballot to be missing its security markers, since voting equipment is designed to reject ballots without them.) The third was paper weight — the forensics tables had scales for weighing ballots, though I never saw anyone use them — and texture. Volunteers scrutinized ballots for, of all things, bamboo fibers. Only later, after the shift, did I learn that this was connected to a conspiracy theory that fake ballots had been flown in from South Korea.


The fourth reason was folding. The auditors reasoned that only absentee voters would fold their ballots; an in-person, Election Day voter would take a flat ballot, mark it in the booth and submit it, perfectly pristine. I almost had to laugh: In my experience, voters will fold ballots every which way, no matter where they vote or what the ballot instructs them to do. Chalk it up to privacy concerns or individual quirks — but no experienced elections official would call that suspicious.

At one point, I overheard some volunteers excitedly discussing a stain on a ballot. “It looks like a Cheeto finger,” one said. “Like someone’s touched it with cheese dust!” That had to be suspicious, their teammate agreed. Why would someone come to the polls with cheese powder on their hands? But I’ve seen ballots stained with almost anything you can imagine, including coffee, grease and, yes, cheese powder. Again, when you have experience working with hundreds of thousands of ballots, you see some messes: That’s evidence of humanity’s idiosyncrasies, not foul play.

Their equipment worried me more than their wild theorizing. At the forensics tables, auditors took a photo of each ballot using a camera suspended by a frame, then passed the ballot to someone operating a lightbox with four microscope cameras attached. This was a huge deviation from the norm. Usually, all equipment that election officials use to handle a ballot — from creating to scanning to tallying it — has been federally tested and certified; often, states will conduct further tests before their jurisdictions accept the machines. It jarred me to see volunteers using this untested, uncertified equipment on ballots, claiming that the images would be used at some point in the future for an electronic re-tally.

Democrats lavishly praising U.S. elections are overlooking a major weakness

In a sense, it was heartening that, whenever the secretary of state released letters listing our concerns, the auditors would try to address them. On my first day in the stadium, for example, I noticed runners collecting tally sheets from the counting tables and bringing them to a single person who entered the data into some kind of aggregation spreadsheet, without anyone to verify that this person was entering the data correctly. By my last day of observation, on May 7, the auditors were attempting to set up a quality-control station.

But procedures should never change in the middle of an audit. Here, they did, and not just a couple of times, but almost daily. The training for volunteers also evolved. When I asked my designated auditor about these shifting guidelines, he called it “process improvement.”

What I saw in Arizona shook me. If the process wraps up and Cyber Ninjas puts together some kind of report, that report will almost certainly claim that there were issues with Maricopa County’s ballots. After all, Cyber Ninjas chief executive Doug Logan has publicly voiced his wild conspiracy theories about the 2020 election. But the real problem is the so-called audit itself.

Audits are supposed to make us better. They are supposed to make our elections more secure and transparent — to strengthen the public’s trust in our democratic process. Maricopa County is known for having some of the best election practices in the country: Officials had already undertaken a hand-count audit and a forensic audit of their 2020 ballots and found no evidence of fraud. Now a group with no expertise, improvising procedures as they go, is sowing doubt about the outcome of a well-run election.

This is not an audit, and I don’t see how this can have a good outcome.


At best, this is a little grift for a Florida Republican.
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real-human



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2021 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/national-review-writer-can-attest-to-trump-pressing-conservatives-to-say-election-was-stolen/ar-AAKGnPk


National Review writer 'can attest' to Trump pressing conservatives to say election was 'stolen'


Quote:
Missouri governor does not pardon Kevin Strickland, whose innocence claim…
Ex-Treasury official sentenced to 6 months in prison for leaking banking…

A National Review journalist says New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman is correct: Former President Trump is asking conservative writers to spread the theory he'll be reinstated after his false claims that the 2020 election was stolen are proven true.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: National Review writer 'can attest' to Trump pressing conservatives to say election was 'stolen'© Getty Images National Review writer 'can attest' to Trump pressing conservatives to say election was 'stolen'
A number of sources have confirmed that Trump is "trying hard to recruit journalists, politicians, and other influential figures to promulgate this belief," senior writer C.W. Cooke wrote in a Thursday piece titled "Maggie Haberman Is Right."


Trump also truly believes that he'll be reinstated to office after a number of election audits in Arizona and other states are finished, Cooke added.

A spokesperson for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.

Cooke's story comes a day after Haberman described Trump's efforts to recruit conservative opinionmakers on the CNN show "New Day."

"He has been trying to get conservative writers to publish, you know, in a more mainstream way that this election was, quote unquote, stolen from him," Haberman told host John Berman, without naming any writers.

Haberman had initially tweeted Tuesday that Trump believes he will be reinstated.


Like many after hearing that idea, Cooke pointed out in his piece that there is no constitutional mechanism that would allow that to happen.

"[Reinstatement] is a rejection of reality, a rejection of law, and, ultimately, a rejection of the entire system of American government," he wrote.

"There is no Reinstatement Clause within the United States Constitution. Hell, there is nothing even approximating a Reinstatement Clause within the United States Constitution."

Jay Caruso, managing editor of the Washington Examiner magazine, agreed with Cooke's assessment.

"It's a wild-eyed fantasy," Caruso said. "There is no constitutional mechanism for reinstatement for a president. The election was certified and Biden was sworn in. It's not like Trump was unjustly fired from the workplace and found to have done no wrong."

The National Review has called out Trump for his behavior since losing the 2020 election to President Biden, with its editorial board saying his challenges are "disgraceful" and that "almost nothing that the Trump team has alleged has withstood the slightest scrutiny."

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real-human



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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/joe-manchin-s-highly-suspicious-reversal-on-voting-bill-follows-donation-from-corporate-lobby/ar-AAKTTDW?ocid=msedgntp


Joe Manchin's "highly suspicious" reversal on voting bill follows donation from corporate lobby


Quote:
Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) heads to a vote in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol on June 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The spotlight on Sen. Manchin grew even brighter after declaring that he will vote against the Democrats voting rights bill, the For the People Act, in his op-ed that was published in the Charleston Gazette-Mail over the weekend. Samuel Corum/Getty Images


Sen. Joe Manchin, the West Virginia Democrat famous for his vow to maintain the Senate filibuster and thereby scuttle much of President Biden's agenda, recently published an op-ed opposing the For the People Act, Democrats' whopping voting-rights bill. That article strongly echoed talking points from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — and appeared shortly after the influential pro-business lobby resumed donations to Manchin's campaign after nearly a decade.

Manchin, who co-sponsored the sweeping voting rights legislation in 2019 and has supported filibuster reform in the past, became the first Senate Democrat to oppose the bill this week while reiterating his opposition to changing the filibuster, a key roadblock to voting reform. Skeptical members of Manchin's party have questioned the reasons for his opposition, especially after after a recent poll found that a majority of West Virginia voters support changing the filibuster rules and that 79% of the state's voters — including a large majority of Republicans — support the For the People Act.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., suggested that Manchin's opposition to the proposal and filibuster reform may really be about measures in the bill aimed at cracking down on lobbyists and dark money.

"This is probably just as much a part of Joe Manchin's calculus than anything else," she told MSNBC on Tuesday. "You look at the Koch brothers and you look at organizations like the Heritage Foundation and conservative lobby groups that are doing a victory lap ... over the fact that Manchin refuses to change on the filibuster. And I think that these two things are very closely intertwined."

Americans for Prosperity, a group backed by billionaire Republican donor Charles Koch, has explicitly targeted Manchin in its pressure campaign to defeat the legislation even though their own data shows that provisions cracking down on dark money are highly popular, including among Republican voters. Heritage Action, the advocacy arm of the Koch-backed Heritage Foundation, organized a rally earlier this year to pressure Manchin to oppose the bill. Heritage Action has also partnered with the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to craft model voting-restriction laws for Republican state legislators. A Heritage Action organizer boasted in a video obtained by Mother Jones that the group was behind key provisions of the controversial law recently passed in Georgia.

"Joe Manchin isn't moved by leaders who have spent decades organizing for civil rights," Rep. Jamaal Bowman, D-N.Y., tweeted after Manchin that said his position on the For the People Act had not changed after meeting with civil rights leaders on Tuesday. "Manchin isn't moved by the views of his constituents. Manchin isn't moved by GOP voter suppression bills in 43 states. Because Manchin is only moved by corporate donors and their agenda."

One group that has been a major cheerleader of Manchin's staunch opposition is the aforementioned U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a powerful pro-business group that also receives Koch money and generally supports Republicans.

Manchin's op-ed announcing his opposition echoed the Chamber's talking points in a letter to senators alleging that "partisan" legislation would "undermine" public confidence in democracy, even though Republicans across the country have advanced and enacted overtly partisan bills aimed at restricting ballot access.

"When it comes to this 'bipartisan' argument, I gotta tell you, I don't buy it," Ocasio-Cortez said. "Joe Manchin has voted for bills that have not been bipartisan before. Look at the American Rescue Plan. So this is not just about bipartisanship."

The op-ed came after the Chamber, which has launched an expensive lobbying effort against the bill, resumed donations to Manchin's campaign for the first time since 2012. Reuters described this flow of corporate dollars as a "reward" for Manchin's opposition to numerous Biden administration's initiatives, as well as his stalwart support for the filibuster, which has almost certainly doomed the For the People Act.

"The timing of Sen. Manchin's announcement is highly suspicious," Kyle Herrig, president of the progressive government watchdog group Accountable.US, said in a statement to Salon. "Not long after the Chamber reopened their corporate checkbook for him, he made his opposition to voting rights known. Now millions of Americans may face significant roadblocks when they try to exercise their constitutional right to vote. Once again the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has found a way to stop any progress on voting rights from progressing on Capitol Hill."

Manchin's office and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce did not respond to questions from Salon.

The Chamber is one of the most powerful trade groups in the country, spending more than $80 million on lobbying last year, second only to the National Association of Realtors. It is the single largest lobbying spender this year, dropping over $17 million to influence policy, nearly twice as much as the pharmaceutical trade group PhRMA. The group has been aggressively lobbying against the For the People Act since 2019, spending more than $129 million on opposing the bill and related issues since it was first introduced in the House, according to lobbying disclosures.

While the U.S. Chamber's corporate members pay for its lobbying, its PAC donations come from the group's executives, staff members and other affiliated individuals. The Chamber's PAC made a contribution to Manchin in the first quarter of this year, its first since 2012. Shortly after, the Chamber issued an alert to all members of the Senate threatening to include "votes related to this bill in our annual How They Voted scorecard" and mentioning some of its specific provisions, including a requirement to disclose big donors and communications with candidates, a plan to strengthen the Federal Election Commission, and public financing of campaigns.

"The Chamber is deeply troubled by efforts at the state and federal level to enact election law changes on a partisan basis," the letter said. "Changes enacted on a partisan basis are the most likely to erode access and security and undermine public confidence and the willingness of the American people to trust and accept future election outcomes."

Manchin echoed that argument in his op-ed, writing that he believes "partisan voting legislation will destroy the already weakening binds of our democracy" and "partisan policymaking won't instill confidence in our democracy — it will destroy it."

Both the Chamber and Manchin have called for lawmakers to advance voting legislation on a "bipartisan" basis, although it's inarguable that one party is seeking to expand voting rights while the other is actively trying to restrict them. Manchin has claimed there is bipartisan support for the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would require states to pre-clear voting changes with the Justice Department. That's technically true: Exactly one Republican senator (Lisa Murkowski of Alaska) has expressed support for the bill. But Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell declared on Tuesday that his party would not support the legislation and denied that there was any threat to voting rights.

Manchin, whose ties to the U.S. Chamber date back to at least 2010, when he was West Virginia governor, drew public praise from Chamber president and CEO Suzanne Clark earlier this year for his "principled stand" on preserving the filibuster, which is the most significant roadblock to the voting legislation.

Nick Vaugh, a lobbyist for the Chamber, presented Manchin with a "Spirit of Free Enterprise Award" in 2019, which the group says it gives to lawmakers who have supported its positions at least 70% of the time.

As it happens, Vaugh has been registered to lobby senators on the For the People Act and other issues since 2019, according to federal disclosure forms.

"It's unfortunate Sen. Manchin has bought into the U.S. Chamber's smears against the For The People Act," Herrig told Salon. "And just like the Chamber, he is wrong — there is nothing 'partisan' about protecting the right to vote for all Americans. In carrying the Chamber's water, Sen. Manchin is only inviting further voter suppression."

The Chamber's pressure on senators to oppose the voting rights legislation comes as many of its corporate members have joined forces to oppose Republican voting restrictions in state legislatures.

Accountable.US has launched a six-figure "Drop the Chamber" campaign challenging corporations like Microsoft, Target and Salesforce to back up their public support of voting rights by cutting ties with the group, accusing it of "siding against millions of Americans who will be subject to these racist voter suppression laws."

"It's on Chamber members that claim to support voting rights to end their relationships and speak out against this assault on Americans' rights to vote," Herrig said, "because anything less makes them complicit."

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

so it is a fact right wingers who did attack admit they were following the idiots orders. And right wingers on this forum are so stupid they could not figure that out. That is how dumb and deplorable right wingers that support the biggest liar, molester/rapist and pedophile.

https://news.yahoo.com/accused-jan-6-rioter-tells-131804687.html


Accused January 6 rioter tells CNN he only stormed the Capitol because Trump told him to go


Quote:
Accused Capitol rioter Anthony Antonio says he only stormed the grounds because Trump said to go.

Antonio faces charges connected to the Capitol insurrection.

Speaking to CNN on Friday, he said: "If [Trump] didn't say 'go down to the Capitol,' I wouldn't have gone down to the Capitol."

Sign up for the 10 Things in Politics daily newsletter.

An accused January 6 rioter says he only stormed the US Capitol because former President Donald Trump told his supporters to do so.

Anthony Antonio has been charged with a number of counts connected to the Capitol insurrection, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder, and destruction of government property.

But Antonio told CNN on Friday morning that he only stormed the Capitol after Trump said to go there during his speech at the "Stop the Steal" rally being held before the riot.

"He called people to Washington, DC that day. He said march down to the Capitol. I personally would not have marched down Pennsylvania Avenue and walked to the Capitol, on the grass of the Capitol," he said. "I told you were I was supposed to go. I was supposed to go to Freedom Plaza, that was my plan ... if [Trump] didn't say 'go down to the Capitol,' I wouldn't have gone down to the Capitol."

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