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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 7843

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
The architect of Trump's anti-immigration policies.
Quote:
By Sanjana Karanth

Democrats in the House and the Senate introduced a joint resolution Thursday demanding the resignation of White House senior adviser Stephen Miller over his white nationalist views and racist, anti-immigrant policies.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) introduced the resolution in their respective chambers. It condemns Miller “for his trafficking in bigotry, hatred, and divisive political rhetoric and policies that are inconsistent with the trust and confidence placed in him as a Senior Advisor to the President,” according to the text.

“Stephen Miller is the hateful force behind the cruel and xenophobic policies that have defined the Trump administration,” Harris said in a statement. “His white supremacist, anti-immigrant ideology has no place in our country, let alone the White House.”

Harris led a large group of senators in December in demanding the White House fire Miller in light of leaked emails that showed more evidence of his white nationalist beliefs. The resolution cited the emails’ content as one of the reasons to condemn Miller and call for his removal.

In November, the Southern Poverty Law Center published a series of bombshell reports analyzing 900 emails Miller sent to far-right website Breitbart from 2015 to 2016, when he was working for then-Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.). The emails revealed Miller actively influencing Breitbart stories related to race and immigration by encouraging writers and editors to look to explicitly white supremacist texts and websites.


You must be so proud.



You do know that the Southern Poverty Law center is a scam?????


A good fit for you....full of hate and full of shit...


https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/the-southern-poverty-law-center-is-a-scam
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16269
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matty is unable to counter the racist e-mails.
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 6481
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2020 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
Matty is unable to counter the racist e-mails.
mac is unable to remember he already has an "immigration" thread. Maybe he's related to old uncle Joe.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16269
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2020 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see you have some insightful comments about Techno’s crazy source.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3914

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2020 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I just entered the Twilight Zone.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16269
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2021 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Opinion by George W. Bush
April 16, 2021 at 6:00 a.m. PDT

Add to list
George W. Bush was the 43rd president of the United States.

Next week, I’m proud to publish a new collection of my paintings, entitled “Out of Many, One.” The book may not set the art world stirring — hopefully, the critics won’t call it “One Too Many.”

I set out to accomplish two things: to share some portraits of immigrants, each with a remarkable story I try to tell, and to humanize the debate on immigration and reform.

I hope that these faces, and the stories that accompany them, serve as a reminder that immigration isn’t just a part of our heritage. New Americans are just as much a force for good now, with their energy, idealism and love of country, as they have always been.

I write about a champion runner who barely survived ethnic violence in East Africa, and who told me, “America has given me everything I dreamed of as a boy.” I share the story of a young man from France who followed his dream to become an American soldier, and went on to earn the Medal of Honor. And readers may recognize two distinguished citizens who fled prewar Europe as children, and who each became U.S. secretary of state.


The backgrounds are varied, but readers won’t have to search hard for a common theme. It’s gratitude. So many immigrants are filled with appreciation, a spirit nicely summed up by a Cuban American friend who said: “If I live for a hundred years, I could never repay what this country has done for me.”

The help and respect historically accorded to new arrivals is one reason so many people still aspire and wait to become Americans. So how is it that in a country more generous to new arrivals than any other, immigration policy is the source of so much rancor and ill will? The short answer is that the issue has been exploited in ways that do little credit to either party. And no proposal on immigration will have credibility without confidence that our laws are carried out consistently and in good faith.


“Out of Many, One” is not a brief for any specific set of policies, which I leave to the political leaders of today. However, the book — along with the George W. Bush Presidential Center — does set forth principles for reform that can restore the people’s confidence in an immigration system that serves both our values and our interests.

One place to start is DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). Americans who favor a path to citizenship for those brought here as children, known as "dreamers," are not advocating open borders. They just recognize that young men and women who grew up in the United States, and who never knew any other place as home, are fundamentally American. And they ought not be punished for choices made by their parents.

Another opportunity for agreement is the border. I have long said that we can be both a lawful and a welcoming nation at the same time. We need a secure and efficient border, and we should apply all the necessary resources — manpower, physical barriers, advanced technology, streamlined and efficient ports of entry, and a robust legal immigration system — to assure it.

Effective border management starts well beyond the border, so we must work with our neighbors to help them build freedom and opportunity so their citizens can thrive at home. We cannot rely on enforcement alone to prevent the untenable and so often heartbreaking scenes that come with large-scale migration.

We also need a modernized asylum system that provides humanitarian support and appropriate legal channels for refugees to pursue their cases in a timely manner. The rules for asylum should be reformed by Congress to guard against unmerited entry and reserve that vital status for its intended recipients.

Increased legal immigration, focused on employment and skills, is also a choice that both parties should be able to get behind. The United States is better off when talented people bring their ideas and aspirations here. We could also improve our temporary entry program, so that seasonal and other short-term jobs can more readily be filled by guest workers who help our economy, support their families and then return home.

As for the millions of undocumented men and women currently living in the United States, a grant of amnesty would be fundamentally unfair to those who came legally or are still waiting their turn to become citizens. But undocumented immigrants should be brought out of the shadows through a gradual process in which legal residency and citizenship must be earned, as for anyone else applying for the privilege. Requirements should include proof of work history, payment of a fine and back taxes, English proficiency and knowledge of U.S. history and civics, and a clean background check. We should never forget that the desire to live in the United States — a worldwide and as powerful an aspiration as ever — is an affirmation of our country and what we stand for. Over the years, our instincts have always tended toward fairness and generosity. The reward has been generations of grateful, hard-working, self-reliant, patriotic Americans who came here by choice.

If we trust those instincts in the current debate, then bipartisan reform is possible. And we will again see immigration for what it is: not a problem and source of discord, but a great and defining asset of the United States.


It seems that Republican party is gone.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16269
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2021 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the shameful episodes in American history comes to an end. From the New Yorker:

Quote:
Along a two-hundred-and-sixty-mile stretch of the border around El Paso, the Trump Administration was testing what would become its zero-tolerance policy. The idea was to send a message—by criminally prosecuting immigrants for entering the country unlawfully, and, in the process, by splitting apart parents and children who were travelling together. Gonzáles Brebe and her boys were among the first families to be separated. By the time a federal judge in California ordered the Trump Administration to reunite the families, in June, 2018, more than two thousand other cases had been documented. Gonzáles Brebe’s boys had been released to their aunt, in Philadelphia. She remained stuck in an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facility in El Paso. Lawyers at a local nonprofit, Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center, filed petitions to delay her deportation, but it was too late. On January 24, 2019, the government flew her to San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Within days, she was making her way north once more, through Guatemala and into Mexico. Her mother and niece were now living in the U.S., too. She was the only one left in limbo.

Three weeks ago, Gonzáles Brebe received a text message from Linda Corchado, her immigration attorney in El Paso. In February, Joe Biden had signed an executive order to create a federal task force charged with reunifying families that had been separated under Trump’s zero-tolerance policy. The details of how the order might affect Gonzáles Brebe’s case weren’t yet clear. But government sources were telling Corchado that the reunification process could begin before the fall. A week later, Corchado sent another message: “Keldy, do you know where you can get passport photos taken in Juárez?” The next series of messages came faster; Corchado was receiving more information from the Department of Homeland Security. Gonzáles Brebe was sitting in her room one morning, shortly after returning from the bridge, when Corchado texted a date and time: Gonzáles Brebe was scheduled to cross into El Paso on Tuesday, May 4th, at eight in the morning.

“Something different is passing over me now,” Gonzáles Brebe told me. We were speaking through audio memos on Facebook Messenger. I’ve known her for three years, and have visited her in U.S. detention and also in Tapachula, where she lived for several months. But hearing her now felt like I was listening to someone else. Her voice was clearer and brighter. She’s only thirty-seven years old, and, for the first time in dozens of hours of conversation, she sounded like it. “I’m returned to life,” she said.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20132

PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2021 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How is 21,000 immigrant children scattered over 200 facilities nationwide, from stadiums to pens, many of them loosely "managed" without government oversight, not a border crisis?

Source: The (left wing) AP, after poring through classified evidence your other media don't even care enough about to investigate.
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 6481
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2021 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Every once in a great while Biden lets the truth out, it wasn't that long ago he said "dark days are ahead", boy was he right about that, in so many ways, he's building a long crisis list, illegal immigration just being one of many.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16269
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2021 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
Every once in a great while Biden lets the truth out, it wasn't that long ago he said "dark days are ahead", boy was he right about that, in so many ways, he's building a long crisis list, illegal immigration just being one of many.


Thanks for the coherent message, accompanied by your wise and well articulated recommendations. Laughing Laughing Laughing
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