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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16256
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2021 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It’s minus 45 in Washington D. C.
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1259

PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For mad-dy et al!

I lost the election to Biden
So to Mar-A-Lago I’ll go hidin’
From acts of sedition
On the road to perdition
In my golf cart I’ll go ridin’
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real-human



Joined: 02 Jul 2011
Posts: 12582
Location: on earth

PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2021 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MADD-DY and company you can now helptrump, join his 100 year old soft food joint... massive memberships seem to be opening up...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/after-trump-loses-members-are-quitting-sad-mar-a-lago/ar-BB1d33Da?ocid=msedgntp


After Trump loses members are quitting 'sad' Mar-a-Lago


Quote:
Donald Trump Adviser Warns Republicans About Patriot Party Ahead of…
Rep. McCarthy appears to walk back Trump criticism
CNN logoAfter Trump loses members are quitting 'sad' Mar-a-Lago

Many once-loyal members of Mar-a-Lago are leaving because they no longer want to have any connection to former President Donald Trump, according to the author of the definitive book about the resort.

a view of a city: The Atlantic Ocean is seen adjacent to President Donald Trump's beach front Mar-a-Lago resort, also sometimes called his Winter White House, the day after Florida received an exemption from the Trump Administration's newly announced ocean drilling plan on January 11, 2018 in Palm Beach, Florida.© Joe Raedle/Getty Images The Atlantic Ocean is seen adjacent to President Donald Trump's beach front Mar-a-Lago resort, also sometimes called his Winter White House, the day after Florida received an exemption from the Trump Administration's newly announced ocean drilling plan on January 11, 2018 in Palm Beach, Florida.
"It's a very dispirited place," Laurence Leamer, historian and author of "Mar-a-Lago: Inside the Gates of Power at Donald Trump's Presidential Palace," told MSNBC host Alex Witt on "Weekends with Alex Witt" Saturday. He said members are "not concerned about politics and they said the food is no good."


Leamer said he spoke to a number of former members who "silently walked out" after Trump left office.

Trump moved to the Palm Beach, Florida, estate after his term ended last week. But without the cachet of the sitting president of the United States working at the estate, guests are finding Mar-a-Lago lost a step. There isn't any entertainment on the property during the pandemic, and Leamer added, "It's a sad place ... it's not what it was."

Disgruntled members might lead to a smaller paycheck for Trump. When Trump was president, many people paid up to $200,000 for Mar-a-Lago memberships, Leamer pointed out, and he said they don't think they'll continue paying that price.

Mar-a-Lago has long been ridiculed by critics as a stodgy, stuffy club filled with Trump memorabilia -- some of it fake. Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel on Friday recounted a visit to the resort just before Trump became president.

"You could not possibly exaggerate how comical it is," Kimmel said on The Ringer's "The Bill Simmons Podcast." "Everyone there is 100 years old."

Kimmel told Simmons he went to the resort about six years ago to have dinner with Howard Stern, who lived near the property at the time. He described the Mar-a-Lago attendees as "hunched-over people who are eating soft food" and he said the place is covered in Trump photos.

"It was just quiet and a terrible place," Kimmel said. "And now he lives in this terrible place."

Trump's hotels and hospitality companies were hit particularly hard during the coronavirus pandemic, but sales at the Mar-a-Lago resort increased over the last year, from $21.4 million to $24.2 million. In 2019, the former president transferred his permanent residence to the Florida resort from Trump Tower in New York. But questions remain about whether he'll be allowed to live there permanently, because it may violate his 1993 agreement with the town of Palm Beach.

"Even here, people don't like him," Leamer said, referring to residents of Palm Beach -- many of whom voted for Trump in hopes of lower taxes and a booming stock market. "It's just another measure of how his power has declined."

_________________
when good people stay silent the right wing are the only ones heard.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16256
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will all eventually come out. How many of the Republicans who voted to acquit knew--and didn't care?

Quote:
y
Neal Katyal and
Joshua A. Geltzer
Jan. 15, 2020 at 4:41 a.m. PST
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Americans who have been wondering why President Trump has taken the extraordinary step of trying to block every document from being released to Congress in his impeachment inquiry need wonder no longer. The new documents released Tuesday evening by the House Intelligence Committee were devastating to Trump’s continuing — if shifting — defense of his Ukraine extortion scandal, just days before his impeachment trial is likely to begin in the Senate. These new documents demolish at least three key defenses to which Trump and his allies have been clinging: that he was really fighting corruption when he pressured Ukraine on matters related to the Biden family; that Hunter Biden should be called as a witness at the Senate impeachment trial; and that there’s no need for a real, honest-to-goodness trial in the Senate.

The most basic principles of constitutional law require relevant information, including documents and executive branch witnesses, to be turned over to Congress in an impeachment proceeding. Particularly because sitting presidents cannot be indicted, impeachment is the only immediate remedy we the people have against a lawless president. For that remedy to have any teeth, relevant information has to be provided. That’s why President James Polk said that, during impeachment, Congress could “penetrate into the most secret recesses of the Executive Departments … command the attendance of any and every agent of the Government, and compel them to produce all papers, public or private, official or unofficial.” No president, not even Richard Nixon, thought he could just say “no” to impeachment. That’s why the House added Article II to Trump’s impeachment: “Obstruction of Congress.” It was a response to an unprecedented attempt by a president to hide the truth.

New evidence for impeachment keeps turning up. That's why we need a real trial.

The documents released Tuesday show what Trump has been so afraid of. For starters, they prove that his already-eyebrow-raising claim to have been fighting corruption in Ukraine was bogus. Notes taken by Lev Parnas — who is an associate of Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani and is now facing federal criminal charges — show what his and Giuliani’s mission was when they got in touch with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky: “get Zalensky to Announce that the Biden case will Be Investigated.” Look hard at the real goal here: not to prompt an investigation of Hunter Biden, but to score an announcement of a Biden investigation. Pursuing an announcement, rather than an investigation, makes sense only if Trump’s objective was to dirty the reputation of Joe Biden, a leading political rival.

Both of us served in high-ranking Justice Department positions; we’ve never heard of an investigation that is kept from the Justice Department, given to a private lawyer and then publicly announced — investigations work best when done in secret. If Trump, as he has long claimed, was truly interested in pursuing anti-corruption efforts in the bizarrely specific form of a single investigation of a single American citizen, then he would have wanted an actual investigation. Instead, he was fixated on the public announcement of one — which, if anything, would have harmed the investigation by tipping off its subject. The public announcement would have helped only one thing: Trump’s personal political prospects.

Opinion | If Lev Parnas is lying, we need impeachment witnesses more than ever
Businessman Lev Parnas just tied the president and his lawyer to an effort to pressure Ukraine to investigate Trump's political rival. (The Washington Post)
And if Trump wasn’t really pursuing corruption in Ukraine, then his demand that Hunter Biden be called as a witness at the upcoming Senate impeachment trial also crumbles. This effort by Trump and his allies to shift attention away from Trump and toward the Bidens makes no sense on its own terms — after all, the president is the one being accused of impeachable offenses, not Joe or Hunter Biden. But the effort defies logic entirely, because Parnas’s notes make clear that his and Giuliani’s marching orders from Trump were to provoke a Ukrainian announcement of a Biden investigation, rather than an investigation itself. What could Hunter Biden possibly tell the Senate about that?

Trump’s push had nothing to do with what Hunter Biden did or didn’t do, and everything to do with whether Trump could extort and bully the Ukrainian leadership into casting aspersions on Biden regardless of what he did or didn’t do. That leaves Biden with nothing of relevance to say at a Senate impeachment trial — the final word on Trump’s preposterous effort to refocus scrutiny on the Biden family. That was, of course, the very push that got Trump into this mess in the first place, so to allow him to succeed now through the mechanism of impeachment would be irony bordering on tragedy.

But that’s not to say there’s nothing to learn at a genuine Senate impeachment trial — which, as the word “trial” suggests, features actual evidence and witnesses. That’s the third point emerging from the documents released Tuesday night. One of those documents shows how important it might be to have such witnesses testify before the Senate. The document is a letter from Giuliani to Zelensky when he was Ukraine’s president-elect. It begins: “I am private counsel to President Donald J. Trump. Just to be precise, I represent him as a private citizen, not as President of the United States.” The letter then requested a meeting with Zelensky. This letter is a devastating indication of what has been clear to many all along: that Trump’s pursuit of an announcement that Ukraine was looking into Biden was an abuse of his public office for personal gain. That’s what this letter sure seems to be saying. And it makes clear that what was afoot had nothing to do with law enforcement or Biden’s possible corruption — it wasn’t a request from the official “President of the United States” but from a “private citizen.”

The Senate has conducted 15 impeachment trials. It heard witnesses in every one.

The letter is so damning to Trump that we can foresee the president claiming during an impeachment trial that Giuliani was lying — back then, and even still today. That’s where Senate testimony can prove crucial
. There’s a reason the Supreme Court has called live testimony, including cross-examination, “the greatest legal engine ever invented for the discovery of truth.” Put Giuliani on the witness stand — and Trump, too, if he has the guts. And let the truth come out.

All told, the documents help explain Trump’s consistent push to bury the evidence against him. Every week, it becomes clearer why Trump has withheld documents from Congress, blocked executive branch officials and even private citizens from testifying before Congress, and overall, well, obstructed Congress, as the second article of impeachment rightly describes it. It’s because Trump is a man with something to hide. Let’s see what else he’s hiding — in front of the Senate next week, in a good, old-fashioned American trial for all to see.
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mrgybe



Joined: 01 Jul 2008
Posts: 5009

PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwlYo8EYTWI
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 8587
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2021 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Send that to Kelly Anne Conways daughter, she might get a kick out of it ..
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1259

PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2021 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Goes well with the Trump McCarthy photo!!!
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1259

PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2021 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny how it turned out!
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16256
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2021 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Opinion by
Michael Gerson
Columnist
Feb. 1, 2021 at 11:44 a.m. PST

It is revealing how a political movement that claims to be dedicated to the recovery of national greatness has so readily and completely abandoned many defining national ideals. Donald Trump’s promise of American strength has involved the betrayal of American identity.

One of the most important strands of our founding ideology is civic republicanism. In this tradition, the common good is not automatically produced by a clash of competing interests. A just society must be consciously constructed by citizens possessing certain virtues. A democracy in particular depends on people who take responsibility for their communities, show an active concern for the welfare of their neighbors, demand integrity from public officials, defend the rule of law, and respect the rights and dignity of others. Without these moral commitments, a majority is merely a mob.

What type of citizen has Trump — and his supportive partisan media — produced? Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) still holds her job in Congress because she is representative of ascendant MAGA radicalism. Those who reflect her overt racism, her unhinged conspiracy thinking and her endorsement of violence against public figures are now treated as a serious political constituency within the Republican Party. Trump has come down firmly on Greene’s side. One participant in the Jan. 6 attack sent a video to her children saying: “We broke into the Capitol. . . . We got inside, we did our part. We were looking for Nancy [Pelosi] to shoot her in the friggin’ brain, but we didn’t find her.” The detail that gets to me? She sent this to her children. She was living in a mental world where vile, shameful things are a parent’s boast. And she saw her actions as the expression of a public duty — an example of doing her part.

Call this civic barbarism. Instead of promoting the values of responsible citizenship, Trump and his media enablers are elevating and blessing the very worst among us. They are making many Americans less suited for self-government and more dangerous to their neighbors. And they are doing so for the reason some of the Founders most feared: To lead the mob against true democracy.

How can anyone view the trashing of our founding tradition as evidence of patriotism? Because some have adopted a very different political philosophy than the Founders held. This approach to government promises the recovery of a mythical past. It feeds a sense of White victimhood. It emphasizes emotion over reason. It denigrates experts and expertise. It slanders outsiders and blames them for social and economic ills. It warns of global plots by Jews and shadowy elites. It accepts the lies of a leader as a deeper form of political truth. It revels in anger and dehumanization. It praises law and order while reserving the right to disobey the law and overturn the political order through violence.

This is a reality that I have resisted naming. The 45th president and a significant portion of his supporters have embraced American fascism. And Trump’s buffoonery does not disprove the point. Though he probably cannot name the political theory he has embraced, his own recklessness, vanity and authoritarian instincts have led him down fascist grooves. He displays an intuitive affinity for leaders such as Russia’s Vladimir Putin, Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Hungary’s Viktor Orban. And Trump would have subverted the legitimate result of the 2020 presidential election if he could have, which would have broken a constitutional continuity that has endured over two centuries.

I don’t think Trump came particularly close to success. This time. But the influence of his treacherous ideology is still being spread by unprincipled people seeking influence and profit. American fascism needs to be aggressively marginalized.

This won’t happen if responsible Republicans decline to engage the debate or leave the field entirely. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) need reinforcements. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) needs relentless ridicule for his weakness.

The task of marginalization will also be more difficult if those on the left try to lump all conservatives into Trump’s camp — arguing that fascism is somehow the natural destination of Barry Goldwater’s nomination or Ronald Reagan’s presidency. This is utter rubbish. I was involved, for example, in the running ideological conflict between Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.), whom I worked for, and Pat Buchanan, who previewed Trumpism. Kemp was the more authentically conservative voice. And there is a massive moral gap between the politics of George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, John McCain and Mitt Romney on one side, and Trump’s civic barbarism.

Much about the United States’ political future will depend on shaping a compelling, responsible American conservatism as an alternative to the Trump temptation. This may or may not happen within the GOP. But for American democracy to fully function, civic republicanism will eventually need a home on the political right.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3912

PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2021 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wsurfer wrote:
Funny how it turned out!


That's one way to look at it, but in "Real GDP in trillions"", Trump's first three years where the best three years in history.

Check out: https://www.thebalance.com/us-gdp-by-year-3305543#:~:text=U.S.%20GDP%20by%20Year%20Since%201929%20Compared%20to,Hoover%20tax%20hikes%20%2047%20more%20rows%20
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