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real-human



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:55 pm    Post subject: the vote is in Reply with quote

from ultra partisan ultra right wing forbes

as we know large turnouts in elections are never good for right wingers. that is why they try to suppress the vote every way they can. already huge lines in democratic areas.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tommybeer/2020/10/14/democrats-dominating-early-voting-in-2020-election/#207392341715


Democrats Dominating Early Voting In 2020 Election


Quote:
Updated Oct 15, 2020, 12:39pm EDT
TOPLINE As of Tuesday morning, among the nine states that provide party registration data, registered Democrats had returned more than 3.5 million ballots, while Republicans had returned fewer than 1.5 million, and according to a new national poll, respondents who say they already voted support Biden by a nearly 40-point margin, as it appears the Democratic candidate has raced out to an early lead in the 2020 presidential election.


KEY FACTS
A YouGov/The Economist national survey released Tuesday found that 68% of Americans who have already cast their ballot in the 2020 election said they voted for Joe Biden, versus 29% who voted for Donald Trump.

According to U.S. Election Project data, 22.9 million registered Democrats requested early ballots this year, and 15.6% of those ballots have already been returned.

In contrast, only 13.3 million registered Republicans requested early ballots, and just 11% have sent them in up to this point.

In Florida, as of Tuesday, Democrats have accounted for more than 50% (over 905,000) of the nearly 1.8 million ballots cast thus far, with Republicans accounting for 29% (520,000) of the total.

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real-human



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

as we knew Latin vote was for dems but not huge for dems before. Well the tide is changing and the new votes coming are going to be huge towards dems as noted below.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/latinas-had-the-highest-unemployment-rate-this-year-and-it-s-driving-them-to-vote/ar-BB1a951L


Latinas had the highest unemployment rate this year — and it’s driving them to vote


Quote:
At her majority immigrant Catholic church in a small, conservative town tucked between Austin and San Antonio, Ashleen Menchaca-Bagnulo has watched her community shift.

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Four years ago, religious freedom and abortion were the driving forces behind why some members of her largely Mexican-American congregation voted for President Donald Trump, even if they didn’t agree with his stance on immigration. A compromise, they said then.

But this year, coronavirus has reshuffled those priorities. When it was the Latinx community that got sick at higher numbers, when it was them who lost their service sector jobs, and them who had to worry about bringing the virus home to their intergenerational families. When the parade of trucks supporting Trump plowed through the main road in town, scaring Latinx people like Menchaca-Bagnulo’s sister, a hairdresser who already felt unsafe at work because it’s harder to social distance. When all that happened, things changed.

Now, it’s the economy and health care — two issues that go hand in hand in a pandemic — that top their priorities. That compromise from years ago no longer feels comfortable. For some, it no longer feels possible.

And it’s prompting a political awakening among the people who have felt some of the most acute shocks from the coronavirus: Latinas.

As a group, Latinas have experienced the bulk of job losses this year. The Latina unemployment rate hit 20.2 percent in April, leaving one in five Latinas out of work. From August to September, Latina unemployment rose month to month as it dropped for everybody else. It’s still in double digits at 11 percent.

Latinas are also the beating hearts of their families, the ones often tasked with caring for older loved ones who have gotten sick and for children who have been out of daycare or school for the majority of the year.

But for many years, Latinas in some parts of the country have been largely apolitical, a group with historically depressed voter turnout rates. Typically, Latinas go to the polls at 14 to 20 percent lower rates than non-Latinx Black or White women. Fear that they don’t understand the process, a language barrier or a belief that their vote doesn’t carry weight have acted as persistent barriers between Latinas and the polls.

“Latina women tend to think about what they need to do to preserve their family. In the past, it’s been hard to see how your vote is something that relates to your family,” or even to yourself, said Menchaca-Bagnulo, who is an assistant political science professor at Texas State University. This year it’s become “if I don’t vote, my family is in danger.”

And the economy is a major driving force behind that conclusion.

Nearly half of all Latina workers are employed in the three fields that suffered the largest job losses this year between February and May — hospitality, retail and “other services.” In hospitality alone, they make up almost 15 percent of the workforce, the largest of any group. Latinas also have significantly less access to paid sick leave and remote work. Nearly half of the frontline workforce at meatpacking facilities across the country — where coronavirus has infected thousands — are Latinx.

The fallout is all encompassing, said Jess Morales Rocketto, co-founder of She Se Puede, a nonprofit initiative launched this year with actors Eva Longoria Bastón and America Ferrera to help reach Latinas.

“In pursuit of changing that economic situation, they’re having to make real choices like ‘Can I afford to keep my phone on? If I don’t keep my phone on, how will I get work? Is it safe to leave my kids alone? It’s not safe, but what will I feed them if I don’t work?’” Morales Rocketto said. “These are economic choices, but it’s also about early childhood development and about consumer habits. This is affecting everything.”

A poll in three major states with large Latinx populations — Florida, Texas and Arizona — by UnidosUS, the nation’s largest Latinx nonprofit advocacy organization, found that the issues around job loss or pay cuts this year made over 60 percent of those polled more likely to vote in 2020.

The latest round of stimulus discussions in Congress seemed to completely dissolve when Trump tweeted that he has instructed his “representatives to stop negotiating until after the election” when he says he will pass another stimulus bill if elected.

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real-human



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://news.yahoo.com/black-lives-matter-navy-seal-031036423.html


'Black lives matter': Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says he voted for Joe BidenRetired Adm. William McRaven wrote an op-ed article Monday in The Wall Street Journal saying he held certain conservative viewpoints but also believed in ideas like "Black lives matter."


Quote:


He wrote that he voted for the Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden, because "we need a president for all Americans, not just half of America."

McRaven has been an outspoken critic of President Donald Trump, who he has accused of harming American values and tearing down US institutions.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Retired Adm. William McRaven, a former US Navy SEAL commander who served as the head of US Special Operations Command, wrote an op-ed article in The Wall Street Journal on Monday in which he said he voted for Joe Biden.

McRaven described himself as a "pro-life, pro-Second Amendment, small-government, strong-defense and a national-anthem-standing conservative" but said the US was no longer a country that set an example of democracy.

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real-human



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

here is how despicable right wingers are... notice right wingers are not condemning such acts ... not going to be front page on any major media

https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/2020/10/20/brevard-voters-threatened-emails-purportedly-proud-boys/5997458002/


Threatening emails telling voters to vote for Trump target Brevard County residents


Quote:
Voters across Brevard County Tuesday afternoon received threatening emails purporting to come from the Proud Boys, a far-right group that espouses militant authoritarian ideology, telling them to vote for President Trump, or else.

The emails appear to follow a similar format, and come from the email address "info@officialproudboys.com."

"Hi (name) We are in possession of all your information You are currently registered as a Democrat and we know this because we have gained access into the entire voting infrastructure. You will vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you. Change your party affiliation to Republican to let us know you received our message and will comply. We will know which candidate you voted for. I would take this seriously if I were you. (Voter's address)," it read.


https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/10/20/ballot-drop-box-set-fire-california-100-ballots-damaged/5992101002/


California ballot drop box set ablaze in possible arson, damaging up to 100 ballots


Quote:
A ballot drop box in a majority-Latino town in California was set on fire Sunday night, which may have destroyed up to 100 ballots two weeks before the Nov. 3 election.

Los Angeles County officials are investigating the fire, which took place in Baldwin Park — a suburb nearly 20 miles east of downtown Los Angeles with a nearly three-quarters Latino populationn.

“The arson of an official ballot drop box by the Baldwin Park Library in the First District has all the signs of an attempt to disenfranchise voters and call into question the security of our elections,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda L. Solis in a statement.

“Tampering, or attempts to tamper, with our democracy will not be tolerated.”

The County Registar’s Office has asked both the FBI and the Attorney General to investigate the fire.

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real-human



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2020 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ooooooohhhh baby... if it continues like this the right wing will be removed from all branches except supreme court...

https://dailycaller.com/2020/10/23/early-vote-count-passes-2016-total-11-days-until-election/

Quote:
Over 50 million Americans have voted early with 11 days remaining until Election Day, far surpassing the 47 million early ballots cast in 2016.

While nearly every state has begun early voting, Texas, California and Florida lead the way, with 6.3 million, 5.8 million and 4.2 million ballots cast in each state, according to the U.S. Elections Project.

Early ballots have also overwhelmingly come from Democratic voters who have said that they are much more likely to vote early either by mail or in person than Republican voters, the data shows. Of the 19 states that report party registration data, over 50% of ballots have come from registered Democrats, while 26.6% have come from registered Republicans, according to the U.S. Elections Project data.

The record vote totals reflect a remarkably energized electorate which is expected to shatter overall turnout records, forecasters say.


Of the over 50 million ballots cast, at least 23 million have come from the battleground states that are likely to decide the election, the data shows. In Arizona, Georgia and North Carolina, three competitive states that also feature four tossup Senate races, the early vote totals amount to 44%, 56% and 57% of each state’s entire 2016 vote count, according to the project. (RELATED: 12 Democratic Senate Candidates Raised Over $275 Million In 3 Months)

In states where ballots can be matched to an individual’s voter file, approximately 20% of the ballots cast came from someone who did not cast a ballot in their state four years ago, according to The Washington Post.

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mac



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Republican efforts to prevent voting have in fact increased the determination of Democrats to vote.
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real-human



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2020 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/black-americans-are-fired-up-and-flocking-to-the-polls/ar-BB1ap1Bw?ocid=msedgntp


Black Americans are fired up and flocking to the polls


Quote:
Hillary Clinton 'sick to my stomach' over possible second Trump term
Opinions | Republicans have already packed state supreme courts
CNN logoBlack Americans are fired up and flocking to the polls

Dave Richards arrived at his polling place before dawn, carrying a blue lawn chair and a giant bottle of water.

a group of people standing next to a sign: People wait in line to vote on Thursday, October 15, 2020, in Raleigh, North Carolina.© Robert Willett/The News & Observer/AP People wait in line to vote on Thursday, October 15, 2020, in Raleigh, North Carolina.
It was about 6 a.m. on October 12 -- the first day of early voting in Georgia -- and the business consultant was ready for a long wait in the Atlanta suburb of Smyrna. After three hours in line, Richards, 51, voted in what he called the most crucial election of his lifetime.

"This election is more important than the 2008 one for Barack Obama. That 2008 one was for change and making history. This election is for saving the US," Richards said, citing concerns about racial justice and suppression of Black voters. "The racial divide that is going on, we need someone who is going to be a leader for everyone, not just their base."

Across the country, Black voters are turning out in huge numbers. The stakes this year are especially high, they say, and nothing less than their health and safety is on the ballot.

a group of people in a park: People line up to vote at a shopping center on October 17, 2020 in Las Vegas.© Ethan Miller/Getty Images People line up to vote at a shopping center on October 17, 2020 in Las Vegas.
In interviews with CNN, they said they're worried about racial injustice and police brutality, they feel devalued by a President who has hesitated to condemn White supremacy and they fear losing health benefits if the Supreme Court overturns the Affordable Care Act.

Many said this feels like the most important election of their lifetimes.

During a raging pandemic that has killed more than 223,000 Americans and ravaged Black communities, many Black voters could have mailed in their ballots. But after recent headlines about postal workers dumping undelivered mail and President Donald Trump's debunked claims questioning the integrity of mail-in ballots, many don't trust that process.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Wilburn Wilkins© Courtesy Wilburn Wilkins Wilburn Wilkins
"The pandemic did not scare me," Richards said. "The way that 45 (Trump) was talking about mail-in voting and lying about it, I wanted to do it (vote) in person."


Many Black voters say they don't trust Trump
So far this fall, African American voters are rushing to the polls at much higher rates than they did four years ago, when Hillary Clinton was on the ballot.

By Tuesday, more than 601,000 Black Americans had voted early in Georgia compared with about 286,240 two weeks before the 2016 election. In Maryland, about 192,775 had voted compared with 18,430. And California had over 303,145 -- up from more than 106,360 two weeks before the election four years ago. That's according to Catalist, a data company that provides analytics to Democrats, academics and progressive advocacy organizations.

Keith Green, 65, went to the polls last week in Overland Park, Kansas, to vote in person -- for several reasons.

"We have a racist President who lies too much," he said. "He keeps on saying he doesn't trust the Democrats. Well after everything that has gone on with the ballots, I don't trust the Republicans."

Trump has repeatedly said he's done more for African Americans than any president since Abraham Lincoln. As evidence, he has cited low unemployment among African Americans, criminal justice reforms and increased federal funding for historically Black colleges and universities.

a group of people walking down the street: Voters line up to cast ballots this month at City Hall in Philadelphia.© Rachel Wisniewski/Reuters Voters line up to cast ballots this month at City Hall in Philadelphia.
Some prominent Black Republicans, including Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Jay Cameron, have sung his praises.

But most Black people aren't convinced. Gallup polling over the summer found that 87% of Black Americans disapproved of his job as President.

Green said the Trump administration has left him worried about the future for his daughter and his two grandchildren. He believes Trump has emboldened White supremacists and set the nation backwards on the path for civil rights and equality.

"The last four years have been so bad," he said. "We can't stand four more years of that."

Other concerns include health care and the makeup of the courts
Wilburn Wilkins, 61, woke up early on October 7, put on two masks and headed to a voting center in Joliet, Illinois, with his wife. Although the retiree has pre-existing conditions, he wanted to vote in person.

a man smiling for the camera: Keith Green© Courtesy Keith Green Keith Green
"We have a President who is totally tearing apart our whole democratic Constitution," Wilkins told CNN. "Many people are dying because he is ignoring the Covid pandemic, ignoring the fact that people are unemployed, need financial resources. We need a change."

Like Green, he believes the White House's decisions have undermined Black people and other minorities.

"The nomination of a conservative to the Supreme Court, stacking of lower courts in order to have cronies to carry out conservative ideas, most likely will affect Black and Brown people," Wilkins said. "They'll affect things such as civil rights, Obamacare -- all of these things have the potential to negatively impact minorities. "

a person posing for the camera: Nancy Gakere© Courtesy Nancy Gakere Nancy Gakere
There's a lot at stake in this election, said playwright and composer Nolan Williams Jr., 51, who lives in Washington, DC, and plans to vote in person on Election Day.

Williams has composed an anthem, "I Have a Right to Vote," to raise awareness of voter suppression and motivate Black people to cast their ballots. It features original "Hamilton" cast member Christopher Jackson, entertainer Billy Porter and others reciting the words of abolitionist Frederick Douglass, the late Rep. John Lewis and the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

"For African Americans in this country, voting is the most effective way for us to effect the change we seek. Given the events of this summer, it is crucial for our community to translate our social protests into political action," Williams said, referring to the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and the unrest that followed.

a group of people on a sidewalk: Voters line up outside of State Farm Arena in downtown Atlanta on October 12, the first day of early voting in Georgia.© Drew Kann Voters line up outside of State Farm Arena in downtown Atlanta on October 12, the first day of early voting in Georgia.
"Health care, fair housing, including equal access to home loans, poverty, the environment, meaningful reforms to our justice system, and improvements in community policing are all issues that make this election uber critical," he said.

Some voters are mistrustful after the 2018 election
In Georgia, many Black voters say they have been motivated to vote in person by what happened in 2018, when Republican Brian Kemp ran against Democrat Stacey Abrams for governor while serving as the state's chief elections officer.

Kemp, who as Georgia's secretary of state had promoted and enforced some of the nation's most restrictive voting laws, was accused repeatedly before and during the campaign of seeking to suppress the minority vote. Kemp won narrowly, and Abrams argued that he had used his position to suppress Black votes.

Kee-Kee Osborne, 42, of Mableton, Georgia, said that's one of the reasons she voted in person this month -- to make sure her voice counts.

"For me, the outcome of this election will be the difference between truth and deception, decency and dishonor, inclusion and intolerance," said Osborne, who works as an information technology manager.

"The words, actions, and policies from the current (Trump) administration have deepened the marginalization of Black people over the last four years. It is imperative for our community to be engaged in the process because we have an opportunity to vote for change on every level."

In Los Angeles, business manager and travel blogger Nancy Gakere, 47, woke up early one day this month to drop off her ballot. She also signed up for a tracking service to ensure her vote is counted.

"I wanted to make sure I personally deliver my vote," she said. "This election is so important to Black people because of current events like the killing of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and) the way the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected Black people," she said. "This has exposed the long-standing institutional racism and racial inequalities that exist in America."

But for Gakere, the most important issue is preserving health care under the Affordable Care Act.

"We have family members with pre-existing conditions, and we feel that it's at risk of being overturned," she said.

With Election Day on the horizon, Wilkins has a message for Black voters.

"Many people have died for us to have that right to vote. We cannot take it for granted. This is a privilege that was not offered to our ancestors," the Illinois man said. "They're trying to stop us from voting right now by gerrymandering, intimidation, voter suppression in plain sight -- all things that have been done in the past to our ancestors. That tells you how important it is for us to vote."


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real-human



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

so this is why the grifter is not giving up... he needs to pay off the debt for his bankrupt campaign... con man conning his lemmings...


look at this 60% to his debt...

hahahah

Trump campaign’s push for legal battle donations may go to pay down campaign debts
Quote:
WASHINGTON — The Trump campaign has been aggressively soliciting donations from supporters to help pay for court challenges to the election results, sending out nearly three dozen emails since Saturday with subject lines like, "We need more resources." But it is unclear how much of those donations will actually go to help pay lawyers litigating the voting process in court.

The emails include a disclaimer noting that 60 percent of the money will go to the campaign to pay down debts from the general election and will only go to a "recount account" if those debts have already been paid or if an individual has maxed out on what they can contribute to Trump’s re-election. The remaining 40 percent will go to the Republican National Committee’s operating account unless a donor has reached the maximum contribution limit, in which case the excess funds will then go to the RNC’s Legal Proceedings account or what the email calls a "Headquarters account."

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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2020 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IS the vote in? 28 states use the same software caught red-handed at converting thousands of Trump votes to Biden votes in Michigan, and many counties and states have violated many state and federal voting laws. Sorry to break it to ya, but overeager media proclaiming a done deal means squat. The fat lady ain't even warming up yet.
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vientomas



Joined: 25 Apr 2000
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2020 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well?
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