myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Ideal conditions to learn water start?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19177

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My biggest barrier was my impatience. If I couldn't waterstart within a couple of minutes, the realization that I was wasting precious sailing time prompted me to just hop on (I didn't climb on; I hopped on) and rope start (aka uphaul). I didn't really learn to waterstart until I had no other option due to too much chop to rope start (at Kanaha). Confining my waterstart practice to water I could stand in would probably have set me back months because it's too easy to cheat there.

I've never understood why some people favor small boards for learning to waterstart. It just adds to and confounds the challenge. One thing at a time, grasshopper.

And don't swim the gear around to orient it for the next waterstart. Learn to let the wind do the work, aided at most by grabbing it and rotating everything by driving your horizontal legs and torso in a 6-foot circle just below the surface ... just like you'd spin an innertube at blinding RPM.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3436

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ss59 said:
Quote:
Would agree, not bigger than 6m - also, smaller, relatively lower volume boards are a lot, lot easier to waterstart - the classic second board (litres roughly = weight in kg + 50 ) is ideal

That would be a 120L board for me, which would have been a challenge to uphaul in my early learning days. So the lesson is: don't practice water starting in deep water on a board you can't easily uphaul.

If you are practicing in shallow water near shore on a difficult board to uphaul, then make a successful water start and head to the middle of the lake and fall in. Oops, that can be a really frustrating situation. Add chop/waves to the mix and you can imagine how much fun you will have if you can't repeat the water start.

Corpus or the OBX = piece of cake.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ss59



Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:
I've never understood why some people favor small boards for learning to waterstart. It just adds to and confounds the challenge. One thing at a time, grasshopper.

The reason for this is because higher volume boards sit higher in the water which is harder to get your foot up and onto and then further to come up and out of the water - being able to sink the tail a bit makes it even easier but that comes later - by smaller I mean not a 220litre beginner board - more the size of board that comes after that, ideally.


Last edited by ss59 on Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ss59



Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
ss59 said:
Quote:
Would agree, not bigger than 6m - also, smaller, relatively lower volume boards are a lot, lot easier to waterstart - the classic second board (litres roughly = weight in kg + 50 ) is ideal

That would be a 120L board for me, which would have been a challenge to uphaul in my early learning days. So the lesson is: don't practice water starting in deep water on a board you can't easily uphaul.


I may have got this wrong and so apologies if I have, but I suspect the 120litre boards you are referring to maybe a slightly older model - a modern 120l with a width of 75-80cm should be very uphaulable by a 70kg intermediate without too many issues.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 2314

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Techno. High volume long boards may not be quite so easy to 'lift up' onto as a smaller board would be, but their length makes them far easier to position and hold steady (directional stability) than a smaller quicker reacting board, while struggling to hold and angle the rig, especially in gusty winds and board swinging chop.

I learnt on an early Hi-fly 555 with non retractable centre board by having both feet planted on the board (to scissor it and hold it steady) while learning how to hold and control the angle of the rig. THAT was the hard part for me, and without both feet evenly weighted on the board I would have been yanked off balance having once lifted onto board and hurled off, before being able to react to the pull of the rig and need to steer.

Once that had been learnt it was simple to swop to one foot on board as normal, and transfer the skills to smaller much 'sharper' reacting boards. The next step of course was light wind water starting using a front hand lower mast hold and back hand boom hold (the norm in light winds) or, lower mast and bottom of sail hold to lever body up in crouched position, which doesn't really give any advantage over the mast and boom hold - especially not if you're pratting about showing off, and hadn't noticed that rolling wall of white water rapidly bearing down on you. (Guaranteed to make you look stupid.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
westender



Joined: 02 Aug 2007
Posts: 1165
Location: Portland / Gorge

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried to demonstrate a waterstart on a O'brien Sensation? a few years ago that had a 3.2 attached. In less than 1 minute I gave up. Mast track in wrong spot and trying to maneuver 40+lbs? I don't mind some punishment but not that.
If you're not good at clearing your sail, steering, orienting and controlling your board and rig without touching the bottom you'll have trouble getting into and staying in a waterstart position regardless of the board or sail size but maybe that goes without saying?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9433

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In learning to waterstart, it is important to focus 100% on the effort. To help with that, I recommend getting in a good solid windsurfing session in before you start learning to waterstart. That way you are much more committed and less likely to get frustrated and bail on the effort.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
manuel



Joined: 08 Oct 2007
Posts: 933

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because of my light wind venues, I learned on 9.2, I didn't find it anymore challenging than other sizes. A bigger sail being more stable, it helped me. If rig maneuvering is the issue, one can still practice moving the board around near the shore.

Worst conditions for me are, cold weather, tired and completely overpowered, needing to hook in and get in the straps while still in the water, water spraying overhead. Ok I think I have one more try in me....

_________________
Visit Manu's Windsurfing Blog - Photos, Videos, Tips and Tricks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mrgybe



Joined: 01 Jul 2008
Posts: 4569

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mid sized sail in mid range winds is probably best. Consider a board long enough for you pull the boom onto the back of the board. That really helps to clear the sail when you are learning.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19177

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mrgybe wrote:
Consider a board long enough for you pull the boom onto the back of the board. That really helps to clear the sail when you are learning.

Believe me ... it still does, decades later. Fortunately, my personal ergonomics and harness line length allow that with any board I've ever seen. In fact, some of my older boards have mast tracks a little further back than the newer boards. If your proportions don't accommodate that, it may be worth adjusting your gear so you CAN rest boom on tail, just for the day or two it should (?) take to learn the basics of it.

And I agree with the extra deck height issue with longboards. I hadn't thought of that factor ... but then, is the extra couple of inches that obvious when powered enough to waterstart?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group