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Climate Change
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garoldcrash22



Joined: 08 Nov 2021
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2021 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a terrible topic in my opinion. And in general, for me, my memories of Trump are rather heavy.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17050
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2021 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another of the subjects that Isobars just can't understand. Studies before the Kentucky carnage were predicting an increase in tornado intensity--and duration on the ground. Makes sense--heat is energy.

Quote:
MEANS STRONGER TORNADOES
UPLOAD YOUR CONTENT
UPDATES
13 December 2021
Author
Saima Sidik

Source(s)
Eos - AGU
On 20 May 2013, at 2:56 p.m., a tornado touched down in central Oklahoma. Over the next 40 minutes, it ripped through the towns of Newcastle, Moore, and south Oklahoma City. The storm destroyed dozens of houses and cars, two farms, two elementary schools, a strip mall, and several other buildings as it killed 24 people and injured hundreds.

Climate change is known to affect many types of extreme weather, such as hurricanes, droughts, and floods. But until recently, few studies have addressed whether it will affect tornado outbreaks like the one that decimated central Oklahoma. Matthew Woods, a recent graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, aimed to fill that gap with his recent research in atmospheric sciences and meteorology.

“Climate change certainly raises the ceiling for future tornadoes, in terms of strength.”
Climate change certainly raises the ceiling for future tornadoes, in terms of strength,” Woods said. Using a modeling framework called pseudo–global warming methodology, he predicted that the frequency of warm-season tornadoes will decrease slightly in the United States, but those that do occur may be stronger. Meanwhile, the cool season is likely to see both more frequent and more intense tornadoes. Woods will share his results at AGU’s Fall Meeting 2021 during a poster session on 13 December.

Studying the Past to Predict the Future
Tornadoes are very localized, which makes them difficult for climatologists to study. Climate models are intended to describe widespread effects, and most consider only points spaced tens or hundreds of kilometers apart, whereas most tornadoes are around 50–100 meters across. “Climate models, they don’t explicitly resolve or capture storms because the storms fall between the grid points,” Woods said.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17050
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2021 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Coal and oil continue to lie to cook the planet.

Quote:
An analysis of nearly 15,000 ice sheets in the Himalayas found that its glaciers are melting 10 times faster in the last 40 years than during the previous seven centuries, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. The researchers from the University of Leeds found that the ice loss has induced avalanches, flooding and other crises for communities living in the surrounding regions. (The Wall Street Journal)
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17050
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2022 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
2021 saw the hottest ocean temperatures ever recorded, marking the sixth consecutive year that the record was broken, according to research published in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. The heating is due mainly to the climate crisis, and has impacted all oceans worldwide, despite the ongoing La Niña effects that cause Pacific waters to cool. (The Guardian
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17050
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2022 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Extreme heat in ocean reached a turning point in 2014. Buggy whip manufacturers continue to flog fake news. https://journals.plos.org/climate/article?id=10.1371/journal.pclm.0000007

Quote:
The recent normalization of historical marine heat extremes
Kisei R. Tanaka ,Kyle S. Van Houtan
Published: February 1, 2022
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pclm.0000007

Abstract
Climate change exposes marine ecosystems to extreme conditions with increasing frequency. Capitalizing on the global reconstruction of sea surface temperature (SST) records from 1870-present, we present a centennial-scale index of extreme marine heat within a coherent and comparable statistical framework. A spatially (1° × 1°) and temporally (monthly) resolved index of the normalized historical extreme marine heat events was expressed as a fraction of a year that exceeds a locally determined, monthly varying 98th percentile of SST gradients derived from the first 50 years of climatological records (1870–1919). For the year 2019, our index reports that 57% of the global ocean surface recorded extreme heat, which was comparatively rare (approximately 2%) during the period of the second industrial revolution. Significant increases in the extent of extreme marine events over the past century resulted in many local climates to have shifted out of their historical SST bounds across many economically and ecologically important marine regions. For the global ocean, 2014 was the first year to exceed the 50% threshold of extreme heat thereby becoming “normal”, with the South Atlantic (1998) and Indian (2007) basins crossing this barrier earlier. By focusing on heat extremes, we provide an alternative framework that may help better contextualize the dramatic changes currently occurring in marine systems
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 17050
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2022 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What will buggy whip, flack for big carbon, do to try to deny the science?

Quote:
By Sarah Kaplan and Brady Dennis
Today at 6:00 a.m. EST



In the hotter and more hellish world humans are creating, parts of the planet could become unbearable in the not-so-distant future, a panel of the world’s foremost scientists warned Monday in an exhaustive report on the escalating toll of climate change.

10 steps you can take to lower your carbon footprint
Unchecked greenhouse gas emissions will raise sea levels several feet, swallowing small island nations and overwhelming even the world’s wealthiest coastal regions. Drought, heat, hunger and disaster may force millions of people from their homes. Coral reefs could vanish, along with a growing number of animal species. Disease-carrying insects would proliferate. Deaths — from malnutrition, extreme heat, pollution — will surge.

These are some of the grim projections detailed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a United Nations body dedicated to providing policymakers with regular assessments of the warming world.


Drawing on thousands of academic studies from around the globe, the sweeping analysis finds that climate change is already causing “dangerous and widespread disruption” to the natural world, as well as billions of people around the planet. Failure to curb pollution from fossil fuels and other human activities, it says, will condemn the world to a future that is both universally dangerous and deeply unequal.

Low-income countries, which generate only a tiny fraction of global emissions, will experience the vast majority of deaths and displacement from the worst-case warming scenarios, the IPCC warns. Yet these nations have the least capacity to adapt — a disparity that extends to even the basic research needed to understand looming risks.

Postcards from Earth’s climate futures

“I have seen many scientific reports in my time, but nothing like this,” U.N. Secretary General António Guterres said in a statement. Noting the litany of devastating impacts that already are unfolding, he described the document as “an atlas of human suffering and a damning indictment of failed climate leadership.”
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MalibuGuru



Joined: 11 Nov 1993
Posts: 8850

PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2022 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm enjoying the warmth with my sunroof open as I breeze up PCH in my 911 Turbo S. Actually, it's been freezing.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10313

PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2022 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, a 922 Turbo S. Needless to say, I'm impressed. A top of the line Porsche that's perfect for those Malibu canyon roads.
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1564

PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2022 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be happy with your ride!

Many are going to be waiting a bit longer for theirs!

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/01/world/europe/ship-sinks-luxury-cars.html
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J64TWB



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 1675

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2022 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/e2-wire/598842-temperatures-in-eastern-antarctica-are-70-degrees-warmer
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