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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sun Aug 08, 2021 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Contrary to the claims of apologists:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/08/08/sponsored-green-rides-new-study-confirms-environmental-superiority-of-electric-vehicles/

“…the additional emissions associated with the manufacturing of EV’s are quite small when compared to the significant reductions they provide…”


But the EXXON talking points will still be repeated frequently.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2021 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shh, nothing to see here.

https://www.axios.com/global-warming-cause-humans-climate-change-62515ab0-9df9-4941-a10c-e8d8943101f5.html?mkt_tok=ODUwLVRBQS01MTEAAAF-3ohTDltrNrrZ8M1DAPk2y-ogiJNjosfxE_F2DJX5wbRFeVNJb30_TXp3jKRBvfaR2OSJeU6Vbwp1Efosiyfx2wvWAlsEj1lm1uPUIlBYZnVW

https://www.vox.com/22616968/ipcc-climate-change-report-attribution-extreme-weather-heat-fire?mkt_tok=ODUwLVRBQS01MTEAAAF-3ohTDiwx3wLXWXqE_4UJaHduh4jo_wg4WV24QPt3px_W1iyCyg5THwR2LSd425XN-M1cflXS656obOVcrS4rK-dNhsxpnD7Lu4L2m7pPGIBy
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed Aug 18, 2021 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turns out we've known about climate change and burning coal for over a century. But now we have a new profession--getting paid to deny climate change.

Quote:
Article is authentic
The text in the article originates from a March 1912 report in the magazine Popular Mechanics titled, “Remarkable Weather of 1911: The Effect of the Combustion of Coal on the Climate – What Scientists Predict for the Future.”

The same phrasing was published on Aug. 14, 1912, in the New Zealand newspaper Rodney and Otamatea Times, Waitemata and Kaipara Gazette, which is the publication shown in the viral image. Prior to that, it appeared in The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal, an Australian newspaper, on July 17, 1912.


“The furnaces of the world are now burning about 2,000,000,000 tons of coal a year,” the article reads. “When this is burned, uniting with oxygen, it adds about 7,000,000,000 tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere yearly. This tends to make the air a more effective blanket for the earth and to raise its temperature. The effect may be considerable in a few centuries."

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Reports about coal burning and its effect on the atmosphere date back to the 1800s, according to The New York Times.

In an April 1896 paper titled, "On the Influence of Carbonic Acid in the Air upon the Temperature of the Ground," Svante Arrhenius, a Swedish scientist, suggested a link between carbon dioxide levels and temperature.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Aug 20, 2021 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, a hint as to why the buggy whip makers hated Obama.

Quote:
By PAUL KRUGMAN |
PUBLISHED: August 20, 2021 at 4:30 a.m. | UPDATED: August 20, 2021 at 5:17 a.m.
As terrible as many things in the world are, climate is unique in posing an existential threat to civilization. And it’s horrifying that so many political figures are dead set against any serious action to address that threat.

Despite that, there’s still a chance that we’ll do enough to avoid catastrophe — not because we’ve grown wiser but because we’ve been lucky. We used to believe that achieving big reductions in greenhouse gas emissions would be difficult and expensive, although not nearly as costly as anti-environmentalists claimed. Over the past dozen years or so, however, we’ve experienced a technological miracle. As nicely documented in an article by Max Roser, the costs of solar and wind power, once dismissed as foolish hippie fantasies, have plunged to the point that quite modest incentives could lead to a rapid reduction in use of fossil fuels.

But was it really luck? Did this miracle — actually two miracles, since generating electricity from the sun and from the wind involve completely different technologies — just happen to arrive in our moment of need? Or was it a consequence of good policy decisions?

The answer is that there’s a pretty good case that policy — the Obama administration’s investments in green energy and European subsidies, especially for offshore wind — played a central role.

What’s the justification for that conclusion? Start with the fact that neither wind nor solar power was a fundamentally new technology. Windmills have been in widespread use at least since the 11th century. Photovoltaic solar power was developed in the 1950s. And as far as I can tell, there haven’t been any major scientific breakthroughs behind the recent dramatic decline in both technologies’ costs.

What we’re looking at, instead, appears to be a situation in which growing use of renewable energy is itself driving cost reductions. For solar and wind, we’ve seen a series of incremental improvements as energy companies gain experience, big reductions in the price of components as things like turbine blades go into mass production and so on. Renewables, as Roser points out, appear to be subject to learning curves, in which costs fall with cumulative production.

And here’s the thing: When an industry has a steep learning curve, government support can have huge positive effects. Subsidize such an industry for a few years, and its costs will fall with experience, and eventually it will reach a tipping point where its growth becomes self-sustaining and the subsidies are no longer needed.

That’s arguably what has happened, or is on the verge of happening, for renewable energy.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 — the Obama stimulus — was mainly intended to address the collapse in demand that followed the 2008 financial crisis. It helped a lot but got a bad reputation all the same because it was underpowered and hence failed to produce rapid recovery. (And no, that’s not hindsight. I was screaming about it at the time.) But it also included significant funding for green energy: tax breaks, subsidies, government loans and loan guarantees.


Some of the projects the government backed went bad, and Republicans made political hay over the losses. But venture capitalists expect some of the businesses they back to fail; if that never happens, they aren’t taking enough risks. Similarly, a government program aimed at advancing technology is bound to end up with some lemons; if it doesn’t, it’s not extending the frontier.

And in retrospect, it looks as if those Obama initiatives really did extend the frontier, pushing solar energy in particular from a high-cost technology with limited adoption to the point that it’s often cheaper than traditional energy sources.

Obama’s policies also helped wind, but there I suspect that a lot of the credit goes to European governments, which heavily subsidized offshore wind projects early in the last decade.

In short, there’s a really good case to be made that government support for renewable energy created a cost miracle that might not have happened otherwise — and this cost miracle may be the key to saving us from utter climate catastrophe.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2021 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Flooding in Tennessee, hottest July ever, new IPPC report. Just a coincidence will some apologists claim. From the Atlantic:

Quote:
Across the western United States, 2021 is the year when the unimaginable became the unavoidable. The severity of the threat has been matched only by its breadth. Record heat this summer has battered not just the Northwest, but also the Southwest (where California’s Death Valley reached 130 degrees Fahrenheit, or 54.4 Celsius, possibly the highest temperature ever recorded on Earth). Drought conditions have been reached this year in virtually every western state, including Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, an expanse of at least 1.1 million square miles. The heat and drought have contributed to record wildfires burning across Oregon, California, and other states. (As of Monday, more than 1.6 million acres have burned in California alone, which puts the state clearly on track, with months left in the fire season, to surpass its record of almost 2 million acres in 2018.)
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2021 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
A group of scientists with the World Weather Attribution said climate change increased the likelihood of last month's record-breaking and rare floods in Central Europe, making the 400-year event between 1.2 to 9 times more likely than it would have been 100 years ago. Rapid attribution science is a growing field of study that seeks to quickly determine how much any given extreme weather event is influenced by climate change, using peer-reviewed techniques even though the actual studies are not generally peer-reviewed until later.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20317

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2021 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Food for thought for the few people here willing to read anything longer than a tweet. I’ve been paid a lot of money to condense others’ writing, but you guys aren’t worth the time or effort. No way am I going to spend 20 minutes to reduce the two minutes it takes you to read this in its entirety.

I WILL, however, type two sentences to save mac lots of typing: I’m a moron, a xenophobe, a conservative, an Alabama native, a racist, a bigot, a liar, a plagiarist (to whom the WSJ has granted the privilege, in writing, to cut and paste occasional articles online with full credit), and a chemo-brained senior citizen. What did I miss, John?

From WSJ, Sept 15, by the WSJ Editorial Board:

EUROPE'S CLIMATE LESSON FOR AMERICA

Energy prices are soaring in Europe, and the effects are rippling across the Atlantic. Blame anti-carbon policies of the kind that the Biden Administration wants to impose in the U.S.

Electricity prices in the U.K. this week jumped to a record £354 ($490) per megawatt hour, a 700% increase from the 2010 to 2020 average. Germany’s electricity benchmark has doubled this year. Last month’s 12.3% increase was the largest since 1974 and contributed to the highest inflation reading since 1993. Other economies are experiencing similar spikes.

Europe’s anti-carbon policies have created a fossil-fuel shortage. Governments have heavily subsidized renewables like wind and solar and shut down coal plants to meet their commitments under the Paris climate accord. But wind power this summer has flagged, so countries are scrambling to import more fossil fuels to power their grids.

European natural-gas spot prices have increased five-fold in the last year. Some energy providers are burning cheaper coal, but its prices have tripled. Rising fossil-fuel consumption has caused demand and prices for carbon permits under the Continent’s cap-and-trade scheme to surge, which has pushed electricity prices even higher.

Russia has exploited the chaos by slowing gas deliveries, ostensibly to increase pressure on Germany to finish the Nord Stream 2 pipeline certification. Vladimir Putin last week took a swipe at the “smart alecs” in the European Commission for “market-based” pricing that increased competition in gas, including from U.S. liquefied natural gas imports.

Mr. Putin can throw his weight around in Europe because the rest of the world also needs his gas. Drought has reduced hydropower in Asia, and manufacturers are using more energy to supply the West with more goods. Due to a gas and coal shortage, China has rationed power to its aluminum smelters and aluminum prices this week hit a 13-year high.

The U.S. is the world’s largest gas producer, but it isn’t immune from turmoil in energy markets. Natural gas spot prices in the U.S. have doubled over the past year in part because producers have increased exports to Europe and Asia. Exports are up more than 40% during the first six months this year over last.

This underscores how fossil fuels are a U.S. economic and strategic asset. The Biden Administration’s plan to curtail oil, gas and coal production by regulation would empower adversaries, especially Russia, Iran and China, which are the world’s three largest gas producers after the U.S.

Americans are already feeling the pain of rising energy prices. Electricity and utility gas prices were up 5.2% and 21.1%, respectively, over the last 12 months in August. Higher energy costs are bleeding into inflation. Some analysts predict that gas prices could double this winter if U.S. production doesn’t increase and global demand remains high.

Europe is showing the folly of trying to purge CO2 from the economy. No matter how heavily subsidized, renewables can’t replace fossil fuels in a modern economy. Households and businesses get stuck with higher energy bills even as CO2 emissions increase. Europe’s problems are a warning to the U.S., if only Democrats would heed it.
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 1418

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2021 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:
Food for thought for the few people here willing to read anything longer than a tweet. I’ve been paid a lot of money to condense others’ writing, but you guys aren’t worth the time or effort. No way am I going to spend 20 minutes to reduce the two minutes it takes you to read this in its entirety.

I WILL, however, type two sentences to save mac lots of typing: I’m a moron, a xenophobe, a conservative, an Alabama native, a racist, a bigot, a liar, a plagiarist (to whom the WSJ has granted the privilege, in writing, to cut and paste occasional articles online with full credit), and a chemo-brained senior citizen. What did I miss, John?

From WSJ, Sept 15, by the WSJ Editorial Board:

EUROPE'S CLIMATE LESSON FOR AMERICA

Energy prices are soaring in Europe, and the effects are rippling across the Atlantic. Blame anti-carbon policies of the kind that the Biden Administration wants to impose in the U.S.

Electricity prices in the U.K. this week jumped to a record £354 ($490) per megawatt hour, a 700% increase from the 2010 to 2020 average. Germany’s electricity benchmark has doubled this year. Last month’s 12.3% increase was the largest since 1974 and contributed to the highest inflation reading since 1993. Other economies are experiencing similar spikes.

Europe’s anti-carbon policies have created a fossil-fuel shortage. Governments have heavily subsidized renewables like wind and solar and shut down coal plants to meet their commitments under the Paris climate accord. But wind power this summer has flagged, so countries are scrambling to import more fossil fuels to power their grids.

European natural-gas spot prices have increased five-fold in the last year. Some energy providers are burning cheaper coal, but its prices have tripled. Rising fossil-fuel consumption has caused demand and prices for carbon permits under the Continent’s cap-and-trade scheme to surge, which has pushed electricity prices even higher.

Russia has exploited the chaos by slowing gas deliveries, ostensibly to increase pressure on Germany to finish the Nord Stream 2 pipeline certification. Vladimir Putin last week took a swipe at the “smart alecs” in the European Commission for “market-based” pricing that increased competition in gas, including from U.S. liquefied natural gas imports.

Mr. Putin can throw his weight around in Europe because the rest of the world also needs his gas. Drought has reduced hydropower in Asia, and manufacturers are using more energy to supply the West with more goods. Due to a gas and coal shortage, China has rationed power to its aluminum smelters and aluminum prices this week hit a 13-year high.

The U.S. is the world’s largest gas producer, but it isn’t immune from turmoil in energy markets. Natural gas spot prices in the U.S. have doubled over the past year in part because producers have increased exports to Europe and Asia. Exports are up more than 40% during the first six months this year over last.

This underscores how fossil fuels are a U.S. economic and strategic asset. The Biden Administration’s plan to curtail oil, gas and coal production by regulation would empower adversaries, especially Russia, Iran and China, which are the world’s three largest gas producers after the U.S.

Americans are already feeling the pain of rising energy prices. Electricity and utility gas prices were up 5.2% and 21.1%, respectively, over the last 12 months in August. Higher energy costs are bleeding into inflation. Some analysts predict that gas prices could double this winter if U.S. production doesn’t increase and global demand remains high.

Europe is showing the folly of trying to purge CO2 from the economy. No matter how heavily subsidized, renewables can’t replace fossil fuels in a modern economy. Households and businesses get stuck with higher energy bills even as CO2 emissions increase. Europe’s problems are a warning to the U.S., if only Democrats would heed it.


And your point is??? Burn baby burn?

Prices of everything have gone up.

Predictions, predictions, predictions!

It's all the democrats fault!

What a f'n loser!
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2021 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All Murdoch papers, including the WSJ, are required to pretend global warming is not happening. Isobars is just an angry stooge.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16656
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2021 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rumor has it that a windsurfer from Virginia has also been subpoenaed.

Quote:
The House Oversight Committee asked the heads of Exxon Mobil Corp., Chevron Corp., BP PLC and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, as well as trade groups the American Petroleum Institute and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, to testify before Congress on Oct. 28, a move that marks an expansion of the committee's investigation into the fossil fuel industry's role in casting doubt on scientific consensus on the root cause of climate change. The committee has also requested internal documents and emails on the target companies' and groups' potential disinformation efforts going back to 2015. (The New York Times)
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