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J64TWB



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 1596

PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2021 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They’re watching us. Especially the nay sayers who say, can’t be done. I wonder what they think of our cretin Trump supporters? Hopefully they zap them first.

“Imagine a technology that can do 6-to-700 g-forces, that can fly at 13,000 miles an hour, that can evade radar and that can fly through air and water and possibly space. And oh, by the way, has no obvious signs of propulsion, no wings, no control surfaces and yet still can defy the natural effects of Earth's gravity. That's precisely what we're seeing”. Head of aerospace National security at the Pentagon.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/ufo-military-intelligence-60-minutes-2021-05-16/
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From a very smart guy about UFO's:

https://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2021/06/10/neil-degrasse-tyson-ufo-encounters-newday-vpx.cnn

And then to topic:

Quote:
critical Antarctic glacier is looking more vulnerable as satellite images show the ice shelf that blocks it from collapsing into the sea is breaking up much faster than before and spawning huge icebergs, a new study says.

The Pine Island Glacier’s ice shelf loss accelerated in 2017, causing scientists to worry that with climate change the glacier’s collapse could happen quicker than the many centuries predicted. The floating ice shelf acts like a cork in a bottle for the fast-melting glacier and prevents its much larger ice mass from flowing into the ocean.

That ice shelf has retreated by 12 miles (20 kilometers) between 2017 and 2020, according to a study in Friday’s Science Advances The crumbling shelf was caught on time-lapse video from a European satellite that takes pictures every six days.

“You can see stuff just tearing apart,” said study lead author Ian Joughin, a University of Washington glaciologist. “So it almost looks like the speed-up itself is weakening the glacier. ... And so far we’ve lost maybe 20% of the main shelf.”

Between 2017 and 2020, there were three large breakup events, creating icebergs more than 5 miles (8 kilometers) long and 22 miles (36 kilometers) wide, which then split into lots of littler pieces, Joughin said. There also were many smaller breakups.

“It’s not at all inconceivable that the whole shelf could give way and go within a few years,” Joughin said. “I’d say that’s a long shot, but not a very long shot.”

Joughin tracked two points on the main glacier and found they were moving 12% faster toward the sea starting in 2017.

“So that means 12% more ice from Pine Island going into the ocean that wasn’t there before,” he said.

The Pine Island Glacier, which is not on an island doesn’t have pine trees, is one of two side-by-side glaciers in western Antarctica that ice scientists worry most about losing on that continent. The other is the Thwaites Glacier.

Pine Island contains 180 trillion tons of ice — the equivalent of 1.6 feet (half a meter) of sea level rise — and is responsible for about a quarter of the continent’s ice loss.

“Pine Island and Thwaites are our biggest worry now because they are falling apart and then the rest of West Antarctica will follow according to nearly all models,” said University of California Irvine ice scientist Isabella Velicogna, who wasn’t part of the study.

While ice loss is part of climate change, there was no unusual extra warming in the region that triggered this acceleration, Joughin said.
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MalibuGuru



Joined: 11 Nov 1993
Posts: 8812

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How myopic. Fall is always the warmest down there
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2021 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MalibuGuru wrote:
How myopic. Fall is always the warmest down there


Anti science has weighed in from la la land.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2021 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

By
Tik Root
June 16, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. PDT

The amount of heat Earth traps has roughly doubled since 2005, contributing to more rapidly warming oceans, air and land, according to new research from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“The magnitude of the increase is unprecedented,” said Norman Loeb, a NASA scientist and lead author of the study, which was published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. “The Earth is warming faster than expected.”

Using satellite data, researchers measured what is known as Earth’s energy imbalance — the difference between how much energy the planet absorbs from the sun, and how much it’s able to shed, or radiate back out into space.

When there is a positive imbalance — Earth absorbing more heat than it is losing — it is a first step toward global warming, said Stuart Evans, a climate scientist at the University at Buffalo. “It’s a sign the Earth is gaining energy.”
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2021 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They even get in Texas.

Quote:
Galveston Bay as he talks about the Ike Dike project in Galveston, Texas. AP PHOTO/DAVID J. PHILLIP

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When Hurricane Ike made landfall in 2008, Bill Merrell took shelter on the second floor of a historic brick building in downtown Galveston, Texas, along with his wife, their daughter, their grandson, and two Chihuahuas. Sustained winds of 110 mph lashed the building. Seawater flooded the ground floor to a depth of over 8 feet. Once, in the night, Merrell caught glimpses of a near-full moon and realized they had entered the hurricane’s eye.

Years earlier, Merrell, a physical oceanographer at Texas A&M University at Galveston, had toured the gigantic Eastern Scheldt storm surge barrier, a nearly 6-mile-long bulwark that prevents North Sea storms from flooding the southern Dutch coast. As Ike roared outside, Merrell kept thinking about the barrier. “The next morning, I started sketching what I thought would look reasonable here,” he said, “and it turned out to be pretty close to what the Dutch would have done.”

These sketches were the beginning of the Ike Dike, a proposal for a coastal barrier intended to protect Galveston Bay. The core idea: combining huge gates across the main inlet into the Bay from the Gulf of Mexico, known as Bolivar Roads, with many miles of high seawalls.
Just across from Galveston, at least 15 people died that night on the Bolivar Peninsula, and the storm destroyed some 3,600 homes there. Bodies were still missing the next year when Merrell began to promote the Ike Dike, but, he said, the idea “was really ridiculed pretty universally.” Politicians disliked its costs, environmentalists worried about its impacts, and no one was convinced that it would work

Merrell persisted. Returning to the Netherlands, he visited experts at Delft University and enlisted their support. Over the next few years, Dutch and U.S. academic researchers carried out dozens of studies on Galveston Bay options, while Merrell and his allies gathered support from local communities, business leaders, and politicians.

In 2014, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers partnered with the state to study Ike Dike-like alternatives for Galveston Bay. After many iterations, bills to establish a governing structure for the $26.2 billion barrier proposal, which the Corps developed alongside the Texas General Land Office, recently passed both the Texas House and Senate. In September, the Corps will deliver their recommendations to the U.S. Congress, which will need to approve funding for the project.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2021 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fantastic graphics and information about how much sea level rise adaptation is costing in San Francisco Bay.

https://www.sfchronicle.com/projects/2021/san-francisco-bay-area-sea-level-rise-2021/foster-city
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Jun 24, 2021 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know, it's journalism. Even worse, it's based on science.

Quote:
Extremely low water levels in Lake Mead at the Hoover Dam this week.Justin Lane/EPA, via Shutterstock
Climate change in action
Climate change has plunged the Western U.S. into its worst drought in two decades. And a record-breaking heat wave only made things worse.

In Arizona and Nevada, it’s been so hot that doctors warned people they could get third-degree burns from the asphalt. Wildfires raged in Montana and Utah. Power grids in Texas strained as officials asked residents to limit appliance use to avoid blackouts.

The levels in Lake Mead, which supplies water for millions of people, are at their lowest since the 1930s. In one California lake, the water was so shallow that officials spotted plane wreckage from a 1986 crash.

And that’s just in the U.S. Experts say global temperatures will keep rising as countries — and companies — fail to limit their planet-warming emissions. Smaller countries often pay the price for wealthier nations’ pollution through extreme weather. “Most of these gases have come from the United States, China, the European Union, Russia and other developed countries,” Bernard Ferguson writes. Yet islands like the Bahamas, where Ferguson is from, “are on the front lines of the climate crisis.”

The problems in the West and around the globe are more evidence that climate change is already affecting us. But there are also reasons for hope.


NYT
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2021 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Last week's record-breaking and rare heat wave in the Pacific Northwest "would have been virtually impossible without climate change," said Geert Jan van Oldenborgh of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, a member of the international team of climate researchers known as the World Weather Attribution. The study also found that such extreme heat waves will become less rare if the planet warms an additional 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit. (The New York Times)
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16660
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2021 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A billion marine organisms in the estuaries in the Pacific Northwest died from the recent heat wave. I'm glad that I don't have lying about global warming, and making money from the lies, on my conscience.
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