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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10028

PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2020 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I intended to post the Washington Post article included by mac above, but he obviously beat me to it. It's definitely worth a read.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Jan 01, 2021 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I expect a response from NW that again demonstrates that he thinks river silt will counteract sea level rise. Sigh.

https://graphics.reuters.com/ENVIRONMENT-2020/WARMING/qzjpqdadnvx/

A couple of key quotes, that won't be a surprise, even to Exxon apologists.

Quote:
“While all extreme events have multiple causes we’re increasingly seeing the fingerprints of climate change in our weather, including events that would be almost impossible to imagine happening without human-caused climate change,” said Friederike Otto, associate director of the Environmental Change Institute at the University of Oxford.

Surface temperature difference between 2020 and the 1981-2010 average
Average temperatures from Nov. 2019 to Oct. 2020 were unusually high in Siberia and across the Arctic region.

For example, when a new record temperature for the Arctic, 38°C (100.4°F), was recorded in the Russian town of Verkhoyansk on June 20, scientists took only days to conclude that the event was at least 600 times more likely to have occurred due to climate change. Heat continued to bake Siberian Russia through the summer, with average temperatures in the Arctic hitting exceptional highs into late November.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2021 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From this morning's Morning Consult:

Quote:
The Copernicus Climate Change Service said 2020 tied with 2016 for the world's hottest year on record and that the past decade was the warmest ever observed. On Jan. 14, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Berkeley Earth are set to release their data on last year's global temperatures and are expected to rank 2020 as the hottest or second-warmest year on record due to slight variations in how they measure worldwide temperatures compared to Copernicus. (The Washington Post)

According to the insurance provider Munich Re AG, U.S. hurricanes, wildfires and other disasters caused $95 billion in damages in 2020, a sign of the steadily growing cost of climate change during one of the warmest years on record. This is nearly double the 2019 cost and the third-highest losses since 2010. (The New York Times)


Morning Consult also showed a chart sourced from Bloomberg that shows the cost of residential solar in the US has dropped from $7/watt to $2.5/watt in the last decade. Thanks to Obama and the Democrats touch in the stimulus bill. You can understand why the buggy whip manufacturers went so crazy and all in on crazy Don. Of course electric cars are cheaper to fuel than gasoline cars.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2021 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh look, more evidence to ignore. Or NW can try to argue that it doesn't matter because rivers still deliver sediment. (He will make no effort to try to think about volume. Doesn't remember enough geometry to calculate volume.) Buggy whip will attack somebody.

Quote:
By
Chris Mooney and
Andrew Freedman
Jan. 25, 2021 at 12:57 p.m. PST

Global ice loss has increased rapidly over the past two decades, and scientists are still underestimating just how much sea levels could rise, according to alarming new research published this month.

From the thin ice shield covering most of the Arctic Ocean to the mile-thick mantle of the polar ice sheets, ice losses have soared from about 760 billion tons per year in the 1990s to more than 1.2 trillion tons per year in the 2010s, a new study released Monday shows. That is an increase of more than 60 percent, equating to 28 trillion tons of melted ice in total — and it means that roughly 3 percent of all the extra energy trapped within Earth’s system by climate change has gone toward turning ice into water.

“That’s like more than 10,000 ‘Back to the Future’ lightning strikes per second of energy melting ice around-the-clock since 1994,” said William Colgan, an ice-sheet expert at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. “That is just a bonkers amount of energy.”

There is good reason to think the rate of ice melt will continue to accelerate. A second, NASA-backed study on the Greenland ice sheet, for instance, finds that no less than 74 major glaciers that terminate in deep, warming ocean waters are being severely undercut and weakened.

Scientists descended into Greenland’s perilous ice caverns — and came back with a worrying message

And it asserts that the extent of this effect, along with its implications for rising seas, is still being discounted by the global scientific community.

Failing to fully account for the role of ocean undercutting means sea-level rise from the ice sheets may be underestimated by “at least a factor of 2,” the new paper in the journal Science Advances finds.

“It’s like cutting the feet off the glacier rather than melting the whole body,” said Eric Rignot, a study co-author and a glacier researcher at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine. “You melt the feet and the body falls down, as opposed to melting the whole body.”
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2021 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A piece of the Nanda Devi glacier breaks off, slamming into two dams and killing an undetermined number of people. Couldn’t have anything to do with global warming, could it?
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2021 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why buggy whip makers hire flacks:


Quote:

By David Leonhardt (New York Times)

Even with its growing tech and health care industries, the Texas economy revolves around oil and gas. And those fossil fuels have created two threats to the state’s economic future.

The first is climate change, which is making Texas a less pleasant place to live. The number of 95-degree days has spiked, and severe hurricanes have become more common, including Harvey, which brutalized Houston and the Gulf Coast in 2017. Paradoxically, climate change may also be weakening the jet stream, making bouts of frigid weather more common.


On the national level, Texas politicians have played a central role in preventing action to slow climate change. On the local level, leaders have failed to prepare for the new era of extreme weather — including leaving the electricity grid vulnerable to last week’s cold spell, which in turn left millions of Texans without power and water.

The second threat is related to climate change but different. It comes from the possibility that alternative energy sources like wind and solar power are becoming cheap enough to shrink Texas’ oil and gas industry.

“The cost advantage of solar and wind has become decisive, and promises to become vaster still,” Noah Smith, an economist and Texas native, wrote in his Substack newsletter. “I don’t want to see my home state become an economic backwater, shackled to the corpse of a dying fossil fuel age.”

Instead of investing adequately in new energy forms, though, many Texas politicians have tried to protect fossil fuels. Last week, Gov. Greg Abbott went so far as to blame wind and solar energy — falsely — for causing the blackouts. The main culprit was the failure of natural gas, as these charts by my colleague Veronica Penney show.

The larger economic story here is a common one. Companies — and places — that have succeeded for decades with one technology rarely welcome change. Kodak didn’t encourage digital photography, and neither The New York Times nor The Wall Street Journal created Craigslist.



Indeed, resistance to change is a basic element of human behavior--and vital to the Republican message.

Can that really be true, do renewables threaten the hegemony of buggy whips? Look at this: https://noahpinion.substack.com/p/texas-vs-the-future?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_nn_20210221&instance_id=27357&nl=the-morning&regi_id=94101165&segment_id=52096&te=1&user_id=50a49ee4eeff8b7d418ff57d217d3beb

Using data from Ourworldindata.org, he concludes that onshore wind and solar voltaic are now cheaper per unit than all fossil sources or nuclear.

His comment:

Quote:
In the real world, of course, there are tons of local economic interests at stake — switching from natural gas to solar and wind might be good for the country, but bad for Houston, etc. We should understand this and be prepared for it, and deal with it as best we can. Nor should we expect folks like Greg Abbott — leaders of places where fossil fuel industries are concentrated — to simply bow their heads and acquiesce to a necessary nationwide energy transition that will reduce their own constituents’ comparative advantage. Human beings, and human politics, don’t work like that.


With the Murdoch empire deeply indebted to the fossil fuel industry, you're not going to hear or read these things on Fox or in the WSJ. Not fake news, bought and paid for propaganda.

But that's not all. The costs of climate change are becoming more apparent.

Quote:
New data from research group First Street Foundation indicates that federal flood insurance premiums will need to quadruple for high-risk properties inside floodplains in order to anticipate the growing threats of flooding spurred by climate change. The report, which comes as the Federal Emergency Management Agency is set to announce new premiums April 1, also said that by 2050, premiums under the National Flood Insurance Program will need to increase sevenfold to address increased flooding linked to climate change. (The New York Times)


The days of buggy whips are numbered. But they will have gotten a free ride from Republicans for the last thirty years--transferring wealth in untold amounts. The opposite of what Mike Fick feared.
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vientomas



Joined: 25 Apr 2000
Posts: 2081

PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the Party that claims to believe in small government, fewer regulations and the free market:

Facing the rising threat of wildfire and extreme drought, Flagstaff, Ariz., unveiled an ambitious effort two years ago to cut the heat-trapping emissions that drive climate change.

A critical part of Flagstaff's climate plan proposed that all new construction get to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040 and that the city promote "aggressive building electrification" to decrease reliance on fossil fuels. As in many places, buildings are a big source of Flagstaff's greenhouse gases, mainly because many are heated by burning natural gas.

But in February 2020, the Arizona Legislature blocked much of Flagstaff's plan for its buildings. With the backing of the state's main gas utility, the Legislature passed a bill that prevents municipalities and counties from banning new gas infrastructure and hookups.

"It definitely put a huge hurdle in our plans for promoting electrification and fuel switching," says Nicole Antonopoulos, Flagstaff's sustainability director.

The Arizona law was a test case for a strategy the natural gas sector is now deploying nationwide. Gas utilities, with help from industry trade groups, have successfully lobbied lawmakers over the past year to introduce similar "preemption" legislation in 12 mostly Republican-controlled state legislatures, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).


https://www.npr.org/2021/02/22/967439914/as-cities-grapple-with-climate-change-gas-utilities-fight-to-stay-in-business
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16192
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2021 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is new:

Quote:
There is reason to believe that the system of Atlantic currents that includes the Florida Current and Gulf Stream is undergoing a massive change that could cause significant changes to the climate of Europe and accelerate sea level rise on the East Coast of the United States, according to new research published in Nature Geoscience by a group of scientists from Potsdam Institute, Ireland's Maynooth University and University College London. The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is "in its weakest state in over a millennium," they said, having used a statistical analysis of 11 sources of "proxy" evidence of the circulation's strength, and found nine of them showed a clear weakening trend. (The Washington Post)
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20108

PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2021 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Climate change gets 65,500,000 hits on Google. It also "claims" that 24 billion cherries weighing 64 million pounds are picked annually in the U.S. You guys better get busy picking them ... and invest in Kaopectate.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 10028

PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2021 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars, to get a better picture of what seems to be going on with Atlantic Ocean currents, I would suggest that you read the following article in the Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2021/02/25/atlantic-ocean-currents-weakening-amoc-gulf-stream/
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