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Nutty California
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5303
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
nw30 wrote:
mac wrote:
Just checking. Nutty California is not bigotry--but that's how they do it in the south is? According to a nutty Central Californian who makes shit up all the time.

mac wrote:
I guess that's how they do it in the south.

High school
"If he does it, I can too".
I shouldn't expect you to grow up anytime soon.


NW keeps thinking he has a gotcha, and keeps failing. For proper use of the English language, what Techno and I were engaged in--when you butted in--was regional chauvinism. You can look it up yourself.

Oh sorry, I didn't know this was a closed conversation.
Get over yourself, as you try to hide behind a dictionary.
BTW, I'm a California native, and this is one of the two nuttiest states in the union, the other being New York, both state governments do the best they can to "monkey up" everything.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 11530
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, the point of using language with some precision is to actually communicate. That point is clealrly lost on NW. Liberal hating? Not “bigotry.” A negative comment by a “liberal?” Always bigotry. Not.
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5303
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now you're trying to hide behind a group! LOL!!!
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3221

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac said:
Quote:
Johnny did it too. And saved the monuments?

I wonder when the liberals in DC will demonstrate to take down the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, etc., etc.?

Half the country has gone nutty.
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5303
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take special note of the first category, > Adults lacking basic prose literacy skills. Released today by MSN news.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
On September 8, 2018, countries around the world will celebrate International Literacy Day. The event shines a spotlight on global literacy needs and focuses on the strategies and resources needed to spread literacy around the world.
While the event will primarily highlight literacy needs in developing countries, there is still much room for improvement in many parts of the United States. Reading proficiency and activity varies significantly from state to state and is affected by socioeconomic factors such as income, educational attainment, and the quality of public schools.
To identify the most and least literate states, 24/7 Wall St. compiled an index of several measures related to reading proficiency, access to reading materials, and library usage. These states are listed from the most literate to the least.

44. California
> Adults lacking basic prose literacy skills: 23.1% (the highest)
> Adults with bachelor's degree or higher: 32.9% (14th highest)
> Public libraries: 2.9 per 100,000 (2nd lowest)
> Registered library users: 57.4% of pop. (15th highest)

35. New York
> Adults lacking basic prose literacy skills: 22.1% (2nd highest)
> Adults with bachelor's degree or higher: 35.7% (9th highest)
> Public libraries: 5.4 per 100,000 (20th lowest)
> Registered library users: 54.2% of pop. (21st highest)
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18769

PostPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because my primary oncologist is in LA, my local oncologist suggested I move there. After I quit laughing, he asked what was so funny. That's when I realized that
HE WASN'T JOKING!

I told him about the sammich, and my opinion of cities and of CA in general as represented in this forum.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3221

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good old California - Taxing texts to make sure no one goes without a cell phone. All they need is another 40 million to cover the billion dollar cost so everyone can be in touch.


Quote:
California considers charging residents a tax for sending text messages

Dalvin Brown, USA TODAY Published 2:02 p.m. ET Dec. 12, 2018 | Updated 12:03 a.m. ET Dec. 13, 2018

The state hopes to raise over $40 million annually by adding a surcharge for texts.

California's Public Utilities Commission is considering a plan that would charge mobile phone users a fee for sending text messages, according to recent public law filings.

The proposal is partially due to landline-era legislation coupled with the fact the people are shifting patterns away from voice calls in favor of texting.
California is determining whether surcharges and user fees on text messaging comply with Public Purpose Programs, which use tax revenue to make telecommunications services accessible to low-income residents. The programs, which date to the 1930s, were given a face-lift in the late 1990s, allowing individual states to impose requirements to preserve what's referred to as a "universal service."

During the rise of the internet, the telecommunications industry was able to elude these taxes by offering "information services" like email and web browsing.

However, as mobile phone users shifted their behavior away from making phone calls, voice call revenue for these state programs has dropped by about a third, from $16.5 billion in 2011 to $11.3 billion in 2017, according to law filings.

Meanwhile, the budget for subsidizing poorer users has risen by almost half, from $670 million in 2011 to $998 million in 2017, the filings said.

The wireless industry argues added fees would put carriers at a higher disadvantage since messaging services like Apple's iMessage, WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger would not be charged under the proposed legislation.

More: California texting tax: What we know about the proposal

The Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association, a trade organization that represents the U.S. wireless communications industry, said in legal filings to the California commission that it has "repeatedly" demonstrated that text messaging is, in fact, an information service.

"Subjecting wireless carriers’ text messaging traffic to surcharges that cannot be applied to the lion’s share of messaging traffic and messaging providers is illogical, anticompetitive and harmful to consumers," CTIA said in the filings.

While state regulators aren't scheduled to vote on the proposal until next month, wireless customers have taken to social media to express their concerns about the bill.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/12/12/california-text-tax-state-considers-plan-charge-messages/2288600002/
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 5142

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
Good old California - Taxing texts to make sure no one goes without a cell phone. All they need is another 40 million to cover the billion dollar cost so everyone can be in touch.


Quote:
California considers charging residents a tax for sending text messages

Dalvin Brown, USA TODAY Published 2:02 p.m. ET Dec. 12, 2018 | Updated 12:03 a.m. ET Dec. 13, 2018

The state hopes to raise over $40 million annually by adding a surcharge for texts.

California's Public Utilities Commission is considering a plan that would charge mobile phone users a fee for sending text messages, according to recent public law filings.

The proposal is partially due to landline-era legislation coupled with the fact the people are shifting patterns away from voice calls in favor of texting.
California is determining whether surcharges and user fees on text messaging comply with Public Purpose Programs, which use tax revenue to make telecommunications services accessible to low-income residents. The programs, which date to the 1930s, were given a face-lift in the late 1990s, allowing individual states to impose requirements to preserve what's referred to as a "universal service."

During the rise of the internet, the telecommunications industry was able to elude these taxes by offering "information services" like email and web browsing.

However, as mobile phone users shifted their behavior away from making phone calls, voice call revenue for these state programs has dropped by about a third, from $16.5 billion in 2011 to $11.3 billion in 2017, according to law filings.

Meanwhile, the budget for subsidizing poorer users has risen by almost half, from $670 million in 2011 to $998 million in 2017, the filings said.

The wireless industry argues added fees would put carriers at a higher disadvantage since messaging services like Apple's iMessage, WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger would not be charged under the proposed legislation.

More: California texting tax: What we know about the proposal

The Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association, a trade organization that represents the U.S. wireless communications industry, said in legal filings to the California commission that it has "repeatedly" demonstrated that text messaging is, in fact, an information service.

"Subjecting wireless carriers’ text messaging traffic to surcharges that cannot be applied to the lion’s share of messaging traffic and messaging providers is illogical, anticompetitive and harmful to consumers," CTIA said in the filings.

While state regulators aren't scheduled to vote on the proposal until next month, wireless customers have taken to social media to express their concerns about the bill.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/12/12/california-text-tax-state-considers-plan-charge-messages/2288600002/



And their next move will be voting by text... Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5303
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

California, trying so hard to be just like France. We'll tax their fingers!

Not so fast, the FCC is telling Ca. that can't be done.

Anybody else notice how Newsom looks like he could be Macron's older brother?
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5303
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2018 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of nutty California!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Published 14 hours ago
California Dem Ted Lieu say he would 'love to regulate' speech, bemoans US Constitution that prohibits him

California Democrat Ted Lieu bemoaned on Wednesday that though he would “love to be able to regulate the content of speech,” including that on Fox News, he can’t do it because of the U.S. Constitution.
Lieu made the comments during an interview about the testimony of Google CEO Sundar Pichai at a House Judiciary Committee hearing, where he dismissed the allegations that the tech giant amplifies negative stories about Republican lawmakers, saying “if you want positive search results, do positive things."

CNN host Brianna Keilar praised Lieu for his performance but asked whether other Democrats should have used the committee to press Google on conspiracy theories that spread on their platforms.
“It's a very good point you make. I would love if I could have more than five minutes to question witnesses. Unfortunately, I don't get that opportunity,” Lieu said of the committee hearings.

“However, I would love to be able to regulate the content of speech. The First Amendment prevents me from doing so, and that's simply a function of the First Amendment, but I think over the long run, it's better the government does not regulate the content of speech,” he continued.

Lieu added that private companies should self-regulate their platforms and said the government shouldn’t interfere.
After his remarks aired, Lieu came under fire on social media, prompting him to go on a Twitter spree to clarify his views, including that he would like to regulate Fox News.

Lieu insisted that he’s actually defending the First Amendment rather than showing his desire to regulate speech.
“My whole point is that government officials always want to regulate speech, see e.g. the Republican Judiciary hearing alleging Google is biased against Republicans,” he wrote in another tweet. “But thank goodness the First Amendment prevents me, @POTUS and Republicans from doing so.”
“I agree there are serious issues, but the speech issues are protected by the First Amendment,” the Democrat added. “Would I like to regulate Fox News? Yes, but I can't because the First Amendment stops me. And that's ultimately a good thing in the long run.”

Lieu has become somewhat a foe of President Trump following his election, often taking to social media to throw jabs at the president.
He’s among the Democrats who’s been flirting with the idea of impeaching Trump over the perceived collusion between Russia and the campaign. He also tried to kick-start earlier this year the impeachment process of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Lieu also raised eyebrows in summer after playing on House floor an audio recording of the crying migrant children separated from their families as part of the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance policy.”
Last year, Lieu was slammed for walking out of a moment of silence for victims of a mass shooting at a Texas church.
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