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Harness issues
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beaglebuddy



Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 696

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding a sliding hook, since going to the waist harness I've found I can just let the entire harness slide sideways on my body to achieve the same thing as a sliding hook when sailing upwind. Can't really do that on a seat harness.
For the waist harness to be secure enough for a sliding spreader bar to work it would have to be way too tight for me.
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2417

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2014 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i am appalled that there is this dogma that seat harnesses promote improper sailing technique. the windsurfing culture is full of enough self deluded BS. please stop repeating ever more utter tripe.

just came from an event in coastal georgia. the sailing club there is aging like the rest of us. they've all stopped sailing larger kits, to a man practically. they now sail only 30% as much as they used to. more maui culture projections anyone?

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beaglebuddy



Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 696

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2014 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jings you are turning into quite the grouch, perhaps you have something positive to add about the multi-fin windsup? Smile
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GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 1344

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beagle. It's easy to imagine we have found the secret of life when relatively new to any enthralling sport such as windsurfing. Every outing is new and exciting, (if the wind obliges, of course), and part of that satisfying learning curve. But what happens as the years pass?

Many have been 'at it' for 30 years or more, and many of us are now old and past our peak. (Old soldiers, and all that!)

We cope by concentrating on the aspects of windsurfing that give us that feeling of continuity, and satisfaction, to remain 'driven.' Maui dreams, and rad to gnarr stuff (for me, and all oldies I know) is NOT any part of that.

Whilst a good B&J , or mellowish surf day, on small boards is still very welcome (but NOT day after day after day) as a reminder of the thrill, we tend to look for more for a sense of purpose in what we continue to do. Is it surprising therefore, that many of us look to longer boards, and going places, or enjoyably surfing them, to meet our needs? Do we really want to be chasing image and fashion changes at our advanced years? (I assume Jingo is no spring chicken either! Laughing )

PS. I always wear a seat harness - lower back wear problem from years of kayaking.
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cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 1249
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2014 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speak for yourself GT, I've got 30 years under my belt, and
I'm still looking for the adrenaline. but then I am younger than you ;*)

-Craig

GURGLETROUSERS wrote:
We cope by concentrating on the aspects of windsurfing that give us that feeling of continuity, and satisfaction, to remain 'driven.' Maui dreams, and rad to gnarr stuff (for me, and all oldies I know) is NOT any part of that.

.
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GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 1344

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, good on you sir!

But I aim to be active at 100, so I'm pacing myself. Cool

Unless, that is, I stick to my original plan of ramming a stick of dynamite down my wet suit at 90 (give or take) and dropping in on the biggest wave of my life, only to blow myself to smitherines (blood and guts all over) just before the inevitable wipe out - goodbye cruel world.

So much still to do, and so little time left - and all that! Crying or Very sad
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14150

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cgoudie1 wrote:
I'm still looking for the adrenaline ...)

Sorry to hear that. That's what the sport is all about to me. I guess that's why I crash so often; I'm always at the edge of disaster if I have any say in the matter.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 1471

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are adrenalin junkies in every sport, and they pay the price from time to time. Good for them. When you reach the age that opens your eyes to just how finite life really is, you begin to value every day and don't want anything to disrupt the good things that are happening.

So, while I am not looking for adrenalin anymore, it occasionally surfaces when I hit my limits of go over on occasion (vary rarely with a bad crash). What is truly exciting and fun is nailing a chop hop or jump where there is measurable hang time, or nailing a full speed gybe while on full plane throughout, or breaking my own speed records, or smoking the competition in a race, or nailing a short board tack, or putting together a half dozen freestyle moves (nothing too fancy) or ?, or?, etc. These always put a huge smile on my face and offer a significant level of satisfaction, but this is were I draw the line.

Everyone has their own goals and many of you are much more accomplished at more adrenalin pumping radical moves. To each his own, the sport is fun and exciting for me at my skill level and age and I am careful to stay in shape and minimize the risks. Most of us do get wiser when we get older.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14150

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I THOUGHT I had wised up enough when my broken back influenced my switch from WFO dirt bike and snowmobile antics to the peaceful, serene, low-risk sport of WSing, then again when I significantly beefed up my body armor in response to cracked ribs ... again. Now I guess I'll have to get a bit wiser yet and keep my fin below double mast high. Bummer.

Grins are only a part of my reward. I'm even more alive when I feel that the slightest distraction from what I'm doing may well test my helmet and my bull riding vest. My primary "trick" is staring a nasty crash due to loss of control in the face and escaping it with a combination of skill, board design, armor, and luck; canned/named tricks don't float my boat because a) the big aerial and/or spinny ones are dangerous and b) the penalty otherwise is just getting wet ... again.

Sure, I'm at risk out there (hell, I played volleyball and sand-lot football at a high-risk level, too), but not NEARLY as much so as these "No-Fear" lamebrains (IMO) who think their endless stream of soft-tissue injuries won't cripple them decades ahead of time. As you say, we must each choose for ourselves where to draw the line, learn from mistakes, and keep redrawing that line. I got lucky this time in that the last half of our 2013 season had LOUSY wind and I found an alternative way to get back on the water safely this season.
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cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 1249
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sooo, you're not getting any endorphines from any of that?
(I know I would, but I'm a cheap date)

I think you are, it's part of what makes the huge smile.

I don't typically exceed my limits (but life is risk). I have minimal
experience with 3.2 conditions, but it doesn't stop me from going out
in them. Once upon a time I had minimal experience with 5.2..4.7..
4.2..3.7..

Now 3.7 is my favorite "condition"

-Craig

p.s. I have definitely "mellowed" as I've aged.


techno900 wrote:
What is truly exciting and fun is nailing a chop hop or jump where there is measurable hang time, or nailing a full speed gybe while on full plane throughout, or breaking my own speed records, or smoking the competition in a race, or nailing a short board tack, or putting together a half dozen freestyle moves (nothing too fancy) or ?, or?, etc. These always put a huge smile on my face and offer a significant level of satisfaction, but this is were I draw the line.

.
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