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In search of bigger shortboard for lighter Gorge conditions
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

frederick23 wrote:
Can you find a offshore site with flat water to sail? Thigh high chop without footstraps sounds miserable. Calm water, lighter conditions, use footstraps (at times)

Did you look at the videos? Google AHD Sealion videos and get an eyefull. They're designed from the ground up to be an excellent surfboard, powered by wind, gravity, and/or paddle.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
For those sailors worried about injuries from using footstraps, I would suggest sailing with just your toes in the straps. That's how I sail, and I've never really had a problem releasing from my straps. And, I should point out that always use booties too. It's a technique that has lots of benefits, and very little downside.

The problem, especially at this stage in the recovery process, is twisting. The SLIGHTEST twisting force on the knee is not only painful but dangerous. I'm told not to rotate on that knee at all yet, rather to walk it around turns and/or do all my pivoting on the other foot.

Before the injury I very seldom caught a foot in the straps (toes only up front, whatever in the back), but now that just one snagged foot prior to full recovery could end my WSing for good, I can't take any chances.
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jfeehan



Joined: 27 Jul 1998
Posts: 104

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:


Before the injury I very seldom caught a foot in the straps (toes only up front, whatever in the back), but now that just one snagged foot prior to full recovery could end my WSing for good, I can't take any chances.


Did the surgeon say you were likely to damage the repair?

i think the graft is pretty solidly in place 10 weeks after the surgery.

was yours screwed in? mine had bone plugs at either end, and was screwed in too. i think the bone gets to ~90% of it's final strength in 10 weeks, and i'm not sure the tendon or whatever they used ever gets any stronger.

exactly what did the surgeon say could go wrong?

here is a story from another more recent surgery i had:

I broke my elbow falling from my road bike, on about April 7, 2010. The repair required surgery to install a large hook-shaped stainless plate with a bunch of screws. That was done about April 15.

My problem was that I was scheduled to start the Newport-Bermuda sailboat race on June 18.

An ocean race can be pretty tough on elbows - just moving around the boat in rough seas can lead to being yanked in an uncontrolled manner and so on.

The surgeon basically said that as far as he was concerned, the bone would grow around the screw holes enough in 9 weeks that he wasn't worried about breaking the repair, and that I would be able to go. He did mention that I might still have a lot of soft-tissue pain, but that would be my problem. the repair would hold.

My PT thought the idea was completely insane.

I went on the race.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="jfeehan"]
isobars wrote:
Did the surgeon say you were likely to damage the repair?

i think the graft is pretty solidly in place 10 weeks after the surgery.

was yours screwed in? mine had bone plugs at either end, and was screwed in too. i think the bone gets to ~90% of it's final strength in 10 weeks, and i'm not sure the tendon or whatever they used ever gets any stronger.

exactly what did the surgeon say could go wrong?

My carefully chosen surgeon relies on the specialized PT he carefully chose. The surgeon and the PT say the graft should be healed by the fifth month post-op, which I just passed a couple of weeks ago. But a) I'm old, b) vascularization is still going on, and c) my top priority is safety, unlike many of his ACL patients who have pro, college, and high school sports careers and schedules at stake. The doc and the PT (in accordance with the research) want my ham and quads nearly full strength before I can play that hard, and that takes a year of dedicated strength training after the atrophy that occurred between the injury and the surgery (12 weeks, to regain full ROM) and then another 3 months or so before I could renew strength training (I used the hamstring donor technique, and the donor site kept tearing loose when stressed until about that time). If it were just the ACL and the tibia and femur fractures, I could be sailing much sooner, but the multiple meniscus tears complicate the process significantly, especially regarding pivoting on the leg. I am still forbidden to do that by the PT, the doc, and pain.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cgoudie1 wrote:
Something you might consider is that the motion of a water start with your injured leg in front up on the board puts serious stress right on your ACL as you pull the board under you.

I might suggest that you always water start with your uninjured leg as the
one up on the board. It will be a little awkward when it's your back leg, but
you get used to it pretty quickly.

It puts even more obvious stress on the hamstring muscle from which my new ACL was harvested. I began very light ham curls something like two months ago, and could get serious about them only several weeks ago. That ham lost a LOT of strength since the July 4 injury.

Just today in the gym I simulated some waterstarts using weighted cables as best as I could. It's a start, it felt fairly sound, and as a backup I also plan to refresh my skills on getting back on a board by placing both hands on the deck and vaulting from the water to my feet. I'll need that when I'm in SUP mode anyway if I go that route.
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Jorionw96



Joined: 18 Mar 2001
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Probably not want you want to hear, but I would take year off. Professional athletes in there early 20's often take 2 years to recover from that severe of a knee injury. Rehab it right and come back next year ready for more mast high air. Slogging around on big board with big sail is boring anyway.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fully agree with your closing statement, but given that I have only a decade left in me even if nothing else goes wrong, a season is 10% of my remaining TOW. I keep trying to tell myself there's some turning and burning available without threat to my knee. If I can find that, I'm combining rehab with fun ... two words not usually found in any one book except the dictionary.

I think every day of some new excuse to pull the trigger on this thing. The latest: if its planing threshold is as low as is claimed, I can sail it on the Columbia 10 minutes from my home in almost any wind direction. I haven't the gear for that at present.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

U2U2U2 wrote:
umm I think the Sea Lion may be a nice option, any cost comparison to the Exocet boards ?

I'm finding so many Exocet prices, constructions, and models that I can't make a valid comparison. The SeaLions seem to run around $1,380, the Exocets near or above that level, up to an extra grand, in round numbers, for carbon. One concern I have about the Exocets is their exceptionally round planform; I can't imagine it paddling in a straight line. The SLs have much straighter rails, and thus may glide and track better when paddling.


Last edited by isobars on Wed Mar 12, 2014 4:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

frederick23 wrote:
Can you find a offshore site with flat water to sail? Thigh high chop without footstraps sounds miserable. Calm water, lighter conditions, use footstraps (at times), take it easy for a Summer and enjoy just being out? Nothing wrong with that.

I overlooked your opening comments last time.
Flat water is easy to come by, but when it's light enough to WS this wide beast at its low wind threshold (maybe 12 kts on FLAT water, less if there's any swell to boost it), the chop is very small. Anything thigh-high will be more like swell than chop, thus somewhere between manageable and pretty good, even surfable and carvable on the steadier days and smoother spots

I've been testing the knee with standing broad jumps onto and off of inverted BOSUs (flat side up) while hanging onto weighted cables, to simulate trying to sail without straps. It was a piece of cake and felt solid on the first try, and should only get better with practice.

MAN, but I hope I'm not talking myself into a $1,400 (or >$2,200 including bigger sail, boom, paddle, leash, some kind of dorky hat, etc.) doorstop with no local resale demand.

Speaking of which ... local experts recommend a 16 foot SUP.
SIXTEEN FREAKING FEET!
The only vehicle I own that long is a Winnebago, and even it doesn't have room inside or on top for something
SIXTEEN FREAKING FEET long. Smile

HTH does one pivot jibe, tightly carve, or surf three-foot swell on anything
SIXTEEN FREAKING FEET long?

If I wanted something ... all together now ...
SIXTEEN FREAKING FEET long,
I'd salvage an abandoned barge. Very Happy
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frederick23



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 438

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At 16 ft. I'd be thinking about a canoe.
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