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5 yr old carbon vs new alloy booms. Which would you choose?
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Barnett



Joined: 11 Jul 2000
Posts: 115

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:17 pm    Post subject: 5 yr old carbon vs new alloy booms. Which would you choose? Reply with quote

Choice: 5 yr old used carbon Chinook Big Wave boom in very good condition vs. new Chinook triple clamp alloy boom vs. new Chinook Pro 1 alloy boom . Which would you choose, for Cape Cod windsurfing conditions and sails in the 5-7.5m range, and why? Forget about price.

Thanks.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14483

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know about the big sizes, but I can barely tell any difference between my modern (new bend) alloy and carbon Chinooks in the 4.0-6.0 range. OTOH, Chinook's new bend and head are FAR superior to those on those 5-yo booms.

Mike \m/
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Barnett



Joined: 11 Jul 2000
Posts: 115

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Mike! The fact that you use an alloy boom says something. Do you think the Chinook Pro1 alloy is much superior to the triple clamp, and worth the extra $50 or so?

I used the new modern shape North booms through a rental shop in Margarita all winter and never seemed to get used to them...sliding the front hand to the head of the boom was awkward as was wrist position when jibing. My successful jibe percentage suffered. However, I think the North booms had a much more radical (almost 90 degree) bend in their front than many other models. Do others have thoughts on this re: new shape booms for jibing?
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14483

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barnett wrote:
Thanks, Mike! The fact that you use an alloy boom says something. Do you think the Chinook Pro1 alloy is much superior to the triple clamp, and worth the extra $50 or so?

I used the new modern shape North booms through a rental shop in Margarita all winter and never seemed to get used to them...sliding the front hand to the head of the boom was awkward as was wrist position when jibing. My successful jibe percentage suffered. However, I think the North booms had a much more radical (almost 90 degree) bend in their front than many other models. Do others have thoughts on this re: new shape booms for jibing?

I prefer the newer articulated "cuff" over the Triple Clamp's comparatively stiff molded plastic cuff, partly because I always used the thick mast spacer, over which the stiffer cuff was a slight hassle to mount. The newer hinged cuff's gaping jaws make mounting and unmounting easier.

The bends are a personal choice. My forearm tendons scream for mercy less often with the straighter boom arms.
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rswabsin



Joined: 14 May 2000
Posts: 220
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First you should check the required boom size for your 7.5 sail - the chinook big wave is 200 cm at the max extension. With that said, there is something really nice about the shape of the new chinooks whether it be their Pro 1 alloy version or the new carbon. For me, the straighter boom arm helps alleviate forearm fatigue and numbness I get after several hours of sailing. Also, the most notable advantage to the new boom shape is in sail transitions - they just seem much easier and natural to flip and grab the other side when jibing. There is nothing scientific I can offer to explain it but the shape of the mono boom head work really well on sail handling especially when flipping the sail - your hand positioning just really feels natural and it seem effortless to grab the opposite side . Plus the new clamp is so easy and solid to attach to your mast. So if you are really concerned about the smoothness of your jibes and general sail handling - i'd go for the new Pro 1 alloy.

Rob

Rob
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Barnett



Joined: 11 Jul 2000
Posts: 115

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:

The bends are a personal choice. My forearm tendons scream for mercy less often with the straighter boom arms.


Other than the different shape, do the Pro1 booms have significant advantages over the Triple Clamp booms (which are about $50 cheaper)? I haven't sailed with either one.
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Barnett



Joined: 11 Jul 2000
Posts: 115

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rswabsin wrote:
Also, the most notable advantage to the new boom shape is in sail transitions - they just seem much easier and natural to flip and grab the other side when jibing. There is nothing scientific I can offer to explain it but the shape of the mono boom head work really well on sail handling especially when flipping the sail - your hand positioning just really feels natural and it seem effortless to grab the opposite side .

Rob


Thanks for your opinion, Rob! That is two in favor of the new shape. Interesting, because I found just the opposite with the new shaped North booms (see my post above). Do you find that most people agree that the new shape makes jibing and transitions easier and more natural? Could it be that the North shape is TOO radical, and the Chinook would be a better experience? Or is it just an individual preference, I wonder?
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loonie2



Joined: 18 Jun 2004
Posts: 127

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't compare shape since I've only had the carbon (zero complaints - would replace with the same). I note you didn't seem to care for the new shape on the North boom... Additional food for thought is salt water & alum.

7.5 may be too big. If the carbon you're looking at is the "narrow bend" the large sail may significantly "sag" on the boom.
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rigitrite



Joined: 19 Sep 2007
Posts: 306
Location: Kansas City

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HUGE fan of the pro 1 alloy booms; I have two of them. Thinking about getting a third for smaller sails.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14483

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barnett wrote:
Do you find that most people agree that the new shape makes jibing and transitions easier and more natural? Could it be that the North shape is TOO radical, and the Chinook would be a better experience? Or is it just an individual preference, I wonder?

I have no clue what shape others prefer. I get a strong impression that most people care primarily about brand momentum, stiffness, price, etc., and totally ignore little things like crippling tendinitis or tendinopathy. Some lucky people will skate past all that, others are courting permanent disability by presuming it will go away. Boom shape is probably 90% preference, simply because no two arms or stances or harness line settings are exactly the same. Just a with boards, if there were a clear shape winner, every manufacturer would sell just that shape.

Foe example, I don't touch my boom during my sail jibe. I throw it away, it spins 180 degrees freely in the air and presents the new side to me, I grab it on each side of the harness lines and sheet in, and away I go. The primary time my hands are near the front curve are when reaching, particularly upwind, and very briefly before each throw.

My sail designer/NASA aerodynamics engineer told me the airflow past a thin foil (as opposed to a double-sided aircraft wing) is so turbulent that it's not important whether a sail touches the boom, within reason.
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