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Windsurfing spot to live?
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19314

PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hanford's contributions to the TriCities and the region include:
1. Tens of thousands of jobs, including high-end trade specialties, lawyers,and engineers of all types and levels. Richland once vied with Los Alamos for the highest per capita number of PhDs in the nation. It still ranks highly in that regard.
2. Many billions of dollars in federal cash inflow to the community.
3. Attracting a large, very diverse, and rapidly growing center of mass of cutting edge research (e.g., several labs employing thousands of scientists and engineers from all over the world), education (JC, 4-year undergrad, grad school), and advanced development and manufacturing facilities (e.g., outer space engines and power supplies, the world's fastest production street automobile. Google PNNL and Tridec for starters.
4. A nuclear power plant belching out billowing megawatts of electrical power.
5. Google Hanford Reach National Monument. Excerpts include:
• "Biologists have documented 727 plant species, 40 species of mammals, 246 bird and 1,500 invertebrate species on the monument and 43 fish species"
• "Our philosophy is to have as small a footprint on the landscape as possible ... while opening additional areas to the public."
• "From the overlook, visitors can see the last free-running stretch of the Columbia River, the Hanford site and far beyond. The view from the monument's Saddle Mountains to the north includes the Cascades on clear days."
• The Columbia is the principal focus of visitor use and is expected to continue to grow in the future for fishing, hunting, kayaking, canoeing and commercial jet boat tours, according to Fish and Wildlife.
• "the Reach has become a major draw for tourists. Visitors include the monument on an itinerary that often also includes local wineries".
• "I think most certainly the monument has put Tri-Cities tourism on the map. It's been a catalyst for tourism,"
• "Eco-tourism was our selling point (to protect the Reach) during those 15 years leading up to the declaration [as a national monument] ... "It also gives us a high quality of life here, and when you try to attract businesses and high-paying jobs, a high quality of life is what people are looking for."

Its primary contribution to the world equaled that of Los Alamos.

Despite all that, a visitor or even a resident who never read a newspaper would never know Hanford exists. It just sits there, all 586 square miles of it, bothering no one except the un- and mis-informed far left whiners who can't comprehend that freedom isn't free. But for Hanford, the U.S. would be under Nazi and/or Japanese dictatorship and/or many hundreds of thousands more people would have died in WWII ... one of the reasons Richland High School still proudly calls itself the Bombers and has mushroom clouds on its logos. Tours of Hanford’s historic B Reactor, the world's first plutonium production reactor, are fully booked out within minutes of their midnight availability window opening. Long-time residents here are very proud of the huge part many locals played in defending the free world from tyranny, and have very little sympathy for baby boomer whiners who have no personal comprehension what sacrifices were necessary to avert it.
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DanWeiss



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 2276
Location: Connecticut, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:
SNIP Long-time residents here are very proud of the huge part many locals played in defending the free world from tyranny, and have very little sympathy for baby boomer whiners who have no personal comprehension what sacrifices were necessary to avert it.


O beautiful for spacious skies . . .

Mike, YOU are a baby boomer whiner, albeit about centrist politics that you declare to be to the left of the sun. I think its great that you like where you live and enjoy wonderful parts of the Gorge. Leave your political rants where they belong.

But if you ever wonder, if even for a moment, why you feel compelled to say that your posts are attacked for being jingoistic or self-absorbed, simply re-read your post. I expect nothing more than your typical response about how you can find nothing that others might criticize, or a feigned ignorance that I posted at all. Rolling Eyes
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WMP



Joined: 30 May 2000
Posts: 671

PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pacspeed wrote:


Repeat as necessary....






I think Mikey has been sipping way too much of that Hanford world renowned brew in that dust bowl out yonder.....





Last edited by WMP on Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:40 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Arrgh



Joined: 05 May 1998
Posts: 860
Location: Rio

PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 12:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Windsurfing spot to live? Reply with quote

boardsurfr wrote:
Are there any places in the greater San Francisco area that are close to sailing spots, but where real estate is affordable?

Boardsurfr, if you are still out there, and haven't beaten yourself senseless with your keyboard by now, I have a couple of places you might check out. Marina Bay is a newer development in Richmond, right on the water near Pt. Isabel. There are a couple of parks you can launch from, tide permitting, and it's not far from Berkeley. (The Bay Area has "micro-climates", so Berkeley can blow when PI is dead and vice-versa.) Climate is cool, but not really cold, pretty much all year. Biggest downside is you have to drive thru a small part of not-so-nice Richmond to get there. One of my favorite towns is Benicia. Warmer, but rarely too warm, with a nice little downtown scene. Closest sailing is still Berkeley or PI, Sherman Island being a longer drive than it would appear on the map (plus two toll bridges.) Some days, especially in the spring, you can stay in town and sail from W 12th Street.
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boardsurfr



Joined: 23 Aug 2001
Posts: 1213

PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Boardsurfr, if you are still out there

Yes, I'm still out there. Thanks to everyone who has provided detailed info. Very useful to hear about stuff like tax rates, weather, and so on. Of all the things posted, I really like the idea of living somewhere where it's often windy and warm, and you can sail right from your back yard.

Anyone out there who moved to Cape Hatteras primarily for windsurfing? I thought Hatteras was primarily a spring & fall place, but it seems Hatteras has gotten quite a bit of wind recently.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19314

PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boardsurfr wrote:
I really like the idea of living somewhere where it's often windy and warm, and you can sail right from your back yard.


Been looking for that mythical spot for decades. Haven't found it. Closest thing seems to be what I have now: a well-stocked motor home based in a versatile, windy area. So far >70 Gorge area launches have been its back yard.

Mike \m/
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mrgybe



Joined: 01 Jul 2008
Posts: 4574

PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boardsurfr wrote:
Anyone out there who moved to Cape Hatteras primarily for windsurfing? I thought Hatteras was primarily a spring & fall place, but it seems Hatteras has gotten quite a bit of wind recently.


I have had a place on the Outer Banks for 5 years........windsurfing was the main motivator........I have not regretted it. The OBX is windy year round........of course there are periods when the wind doesn't blow, but these are usually short. Winds are strong in Spring and Fall..........lighter in the July/ Aug. (Bermuda Highs and fronts provide regular 20s in the summer......tropical action can provide much higher winds and big waves). The winter is usually really windy.........30s are routine. Water is warm in the sounds from March/ April through November......ocean get warmer a bit later. A number of people (including me) sail right through the winter..........air temps in Jan/ Feb are 40s/ 50s......water temps high 40s (last winter seemed colder). A good wetsuit/ boots is enough...........I use a 4/3.

There are plenty of places to sail...........you can sail with a bunch of others, or completely alone.......your choice. Btbill and hodadandy can also give you good info on Hatteras living.
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ducks007



Joined: 27 May 2006
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 8:48 pm    Post subject: back on topic Reply with quote

Your first post is spot on. Sure, you'll get at least 2 people bragging about their sessions in late October, but "no thanks".

Last edited by ducks007 on Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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ccyne



Joined: 28 Aug 2006
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2010 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm here in SE Virginia and we too sail all year round. Asside from July and August you can average 1 to 3+ sessions a week. Throw in the fact that depending on where you reside you are no further than 3 hours from Hatteras Island and that unlocks quite a few more sailable days.

As far as terrain... You name it, we have it. Flat water, bump, waves.

Winter can get on the chilly side and you will definately test the 100 degree rule in Jan-Feb. We do often get prefrontal SW days those months, where the wind will blow 20+ and the temp will get over 70.

Cost of living is quite reasonable. Economic swings don't hurt too bad here as there is a huge military presence.

There are also plenty of other types pf recreation to keep you busy. The Blue Ridge are 3 hours west. We have good fishing and world class golf if that's your thing.

Finally we have a great group of local windsurfers.

_________________
Chris
http://outdrsmn.blogspot.com/
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bmmiller



Joined: 23 May 2007
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2010 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, if anyone wants to find out the statistical wind averages for any popular site go to windalert.com. (You can log in with your iwindsurf.com login info). Search for the please you're interested in. For example, Avon Ocean, NC. Then click on the Details link. Scroll down on the page that loads and you'll see the statistical monthly wind averages. Click through the months to see them all.

Here's Avon Ocean: http://windalert.com/en-us/Search/SpotInfo.aspx?spotid=392

Here's Isobar's stomping grounds, Port Kelley: http://windalert.com/en-us/Search/SpotInfo.aspx?spotid=442

This tool might actually help you decide where to move!
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