myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Windsurfing Videos Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
drysuits vs wetsuits
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
gt007



Joined: 31 May 2007
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:00 am    Post subject: drysuits vs wetsuits Reply with quote

I do not know how low folks go in terms of temperature, but I thought that I will probably go as low as 40F. I have a neilpryde 5/3 with boots, gloves and a hood. Will that setup be enough to confront 40F weather.

For those that recommend a drysuit, can you actually get in and out of one without help?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Frank4



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 57

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It depends how cold the water is. In the fall the water is still warmish, so a 5/3 can take you into colder air temps. I am usually in a 4/3 well into November. If you plan on any real winter sailing and early spring sailing when that water is cold, get a drysuit. I can get into the Bare suit solo if I hook the back zipper to something like a rack or part of your car door and rotate your shoulders. My limit is around 35 air temp.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rswabsin



Joined: 14 May 2000
Posts: 217
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a 5/3 wetsuit throughout the full winter to windsurf and surf and it has been plenty warm for air temps of about 35 degrees and above. A rash guard beneath the suit can also add a bit more warmth. When windsurfing, my hands are always the first extremity to get cold (I use the DaKine winter mits) so I'll stop every 20-30 minutes to warm them up and get the blood circulating in them. I used to use a dry suit but the zippers were to difficult to deal with on your own and the new surfing 5/3 wetsuits are really flexible and thermally efficient. When its really cold, I'll typically sail in shallow bay waters where you can stop on the sand bars or other shallow areas and move your hands/arms around to warm them up without going all the way back to shore. Once you are suited up and sailing, you'll find that it really doesn't feel that cold once the adrenaline gets pumping. But don't over due it, sail for a good hour or two and then go warm up in the car or call it a day.

Rob
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gt007



Joined: 31 May 2007
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank and Rob,

Thanks for the reply.

I guess I am going to stick with the 5/3 and buy something to put underneath on the nastier days.

The drysuit probably works well but it sounds like way too much work to get in and out of.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
OliverTwist



Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 211

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a Gul drysuit. It zips up in front so it's very easy get on and off. I prefer it to a wetsuit because my arms are less constricted. I wear a long john and dry top until the water gets cold enough to need boots. Then I switch to the drysuit.

If you are comfortable in the wetsuit there's no reason to switch. My arms got tired quickly with my 5/3 wetsuit .
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Frank4



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 57

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The most important thing for me is safety. If you break down and have to spend any extended time in the water, the drysuit could save your life. It really is not difficult to get on and off. Also it keeps you much warmer standing around taking breaks ect. All the winter windsurfers around here wear drysuits. ( Long Island )
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coyotewindsurf



Joined: 03 Apr 2006
Posts: 1269
Location: SF Bay

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:38 pm    Post subject: Re: drysuits vs wetsuits Reply with quote

gt007 wrote:
For those that recommend a drysuit, can you actually get in and out of one without help?


Ocean Rodeo Pyro Pro. The zip is in the front and it's easy to get in and out. No friends required. Wink
Great suit...and when you're done sailing you're dry and toasty.

_________________
mo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
RRose82341



Joined: 29 Sep 1999
Posts: 11
Location: CapeCod

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:47 am    Post subject: Wet and Dry Suits Reply with quote

I have a BARE polar heat. It is more comfortable than my wet suit. The latex seals are very fragile. BARE sells the replacement seals and epoxy. I replaced them once and it was painful.
If you attach a string with a loop to the zipper you can hook it on something on your car and that will help to zip and unzip. Takes a little practice.
Normally I'll get in the water and unzip it a little to get the air out and zip it back up.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
speedysailor



Joined: 11 Sep 2007
Posts: 841

PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank4 wrote:
The most important thing for me is safety. If you break down and have to spend any extended time in the water, the drysuit could save your life. It really is not difficult to get on and off. Also it keeps you much warmer standing around taking breaks ect. All the winter windsurfers around here wear drysuits. ( Long Island )
Don't delude yourself. A kiter that was lost in Long Island Sound a couple of winters ago was found fully soaked inside his dry suit because he couldn't hold his urine. Dry suits are warmer in the air, but not when you are immersed for a lengthy time in the water. Windsurfing in salt air and water dehydrates a body quickly. If you are prepared for a lengthy time on the water, you should be well hydrated before launching. That means you should be urinating in your suit. Otherwise you are prone to muscle cramps, cracked and bleeding lips and other rather nasty side effects. You shouldn't be standing around yakking in the wind either, but I've never had any complaint about shooting the breeze in frigid temps with my wetsuits on. I'm wearing a new stretchy O'Neil Psycho II this year. In addition , I've decided to start wearing an Impact Vest and think this will keep me warmer. A hood is a very important accessory as well. I've worn a tight vest inside with other suits. In addition you can use one of those neoprene trunks under the suit. I picked up one this summer. A long sleeve rash guard also might help. There very hard to find these days, but a full turtle neck makes the hood to neck connection work better than the mock turtles that are so common. I've been wearing a short sleeve one for years, but am thinking about finding a long one. My race suit (short sleeves) remains my warmest suit except for the chill factor on bare arms. The long sleeve wetsuit certainly does take more arm strength to use windsurfing. The stretchy one, although less tiring, has a chill factor due to the weave. It's my advise, though, that if you want to sail in the winter, go to Fla. That's what I've done and hope to do again. gt007, I never sail 40 degrees air or water temps and if you ask a professional windsurfer, he would not recommend it.

Last edited by speedysailor on Sun Oct 14, 2007 9:20 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ce3141592654



Joined: 12 Jul 2001
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the kiter that was lost in long island last year was wearing a dry suit FULL OF HOLES to the point where he had to wear a wetsuit under it. i don't know where you got your information but that's not why he was soaked. dry suits are the way to go but i want no part of the typical childish arguments here about which is better so why don't you just go to a local shop and try one on. they are not difficult to get into and you will not be cold. if you are looking for reasons not to buy one then that's fine but if you really want to be as warm as possible its the way to go but at least try one on so you can see for yourself.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group