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How many are longboarding in waves already? Interested?
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2367

PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FWC did not get short boarding winds. I grabbed a couple of hundred waves while most waited and watched. Seeing is believing. Sailing one makes most sailors smile.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/hermeneutic/sets/72157602771529158/

Got 4 sailors to join me with varying degrees of success. It was very chalenging to get out thru some of the break. Outsides were a couple of feet higher at least. There's a technique in turning into the wave at the last possible second by intiating a half hearted tack combined with moving the feet back a touch to keep from getting the foot pinched if the nose gets swung back toward the beach. The nose swings into the wave to pop thru better and the feet are away from any pinch that probably won't happen.
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madmax7



Joined: 07 Mar 1997
Posts: 556
Location: So Calif

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 5:39 pm    Post subject: Kona 10.5 best choice? Reply with quote

K, so there's really no surf to speak of, wind is 5 to 10 knots... I'm 175 lbs want to go enjoy the breeze and play,

Questions,

What size sail do I rig?
What kind of performance should I expect to have on 10.5 Kona, will I get some planning? will I just be holding up the sail?
Those of you that have this board and manage to get it on a plane, what does it usually take ? 10 knots and a 7m sail ?
is it a fun board to have in these conditions? or do you just pack it up? (rem. there's not much surf to speak of ...)

Thanks for input,
Max.
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2367

PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think we need to clarify something about long boards and Konas in the waves. Planing comes with more wind, nearly as much as a large free ride kit, or push from the wave. The little wind that one needs to schlog out thru the break is well below any planing threshold. The push is provided by the waves. The schlog is a matter of patience and practice.

One has to remove the expectation of planing all the time to see the value of longboarding in waves. That's the whole point, one needs only 5-10 mph to get thru and then ride/surf the waves. Capice?

Long boarding in waves has helped me in the following ways:

1. I'm physically in better shape, muscles and calluses.

2. I'm out in it more, and get those surprize sessions that pop up out of nowhere. The skunk factor diminshes drastically.

3. I'm riding more and pushing what can be done more in less wind, thus when the wind does come up, I am able to try new moves.

The 11,5 Kona provides way more opportunity to ride smaller waves, and it gybes stupid easy when planing in moderate winds. Why does everyone believe it to be "too big"? I just don't get it. The 10,5 rips for those with larger waves or are at the top of the food chain technique-wise, for sure, or for the very lightest of sailors. The rest of us need to be realistic...
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2367

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More rants from me on the Exocet forum.

I don't think is imperitive to do the Kona, it does have it's advantages, but any longboard liberates wavesailors from that dependency on the forecasts. Just look for side shore and waves...

http://www.exocet-original.com/forum/read.asp?ID=2105

The Kona does offer a duck tail design that allows for planing with a short board type of drive off the fin. Also, it provides a double rocker for various other benefits.
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madmax7



Joined: 07 Mar 1997
Posts: 556
Location: So Calif

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:27 am    Post subject: Kona board Reply with quote

Hey Jinge, I dont know how to select between the 10.5 and the 11.5. Our average breezes at the beach are 5 to 12 mph at the beach. In the "no wind days".

Max.
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JonTheSailorMan



Joined: 30 Jun 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey jingebritsen, we met over at the surf expo, i was there with britt veihman. anyway, we were talking about longboard wave technique and i got to try out some a the things we were talking about like jibing onto a wave to keep your momentum up (instead of tacking onto one and not catching it). i got a question on that. on super light 2-3kt onshore type stuff as soon as i jibe onto the wave it propels me faster than the wind and i get apparent back windige that ends up just killing my momentum again. got any advice?

p.s. whats your opinion on the kona surf? does it have inboard strap settings? how well does it cruise ocean type stuff in the doldrum type stuff?
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JonTheSailorMan



Joined: 30 Jun 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh and out of the konas, witch has got the best onshore wave performance?
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2367

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 6:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Kona One is more readily available for you, right? I prefer it over the Kona Surf. The newer Konas 11,5 and 10,5 are more dedicated to areas where the probability of waves is high. They all do well in waves. The newer ones are dedicated to being used in the waves at the expense of flat water app's.

In the WS Mag video, I gybed onto a wave 2 different ways. The pivot is tricky with onshore winds and should only be used when there is at least a 10 mph puff. That way, you never quite lose the apparent wind dropping into the wave. The more onshore it is, the harder it is just to do that type of technique. The other is where you sail downwind of the wave and try to take an upwind angle to the peak from the opposite side. Gotta do so early enough to meet the peak when it's most critically ready to break. Below in my very rough illustration, wind is sideon:


wind
shoulder_________ Peak____________ shoulder

---------------------------------------------------------------<sailor

Impact Zone____________________________________________

As you get on the shoulder going toward the the peak, the apparent wind will vector some extra power in the sail. The wave gets steeper as you get closer to the peak, and the board goes ever faster. In the video, where I've caught the wave fairly far away from Eddy, and I'm coming back the other way backsiding on the inside was the pinching method. It was a hoot to sail the wave the "wrong direction" backside.

It is quite the challenge to get the right angle of attack at first. Trying to drop in late with an onshore wind, if it is really light, sometimes has bucked me back off the wave. Frustrating, indeed. Gotta pinch into them then. THe more sideshore it is, the less wind is needed to drop in traditionally. The more onshore and light, the more you have to pinch or vector into one.

Onshore ugly favorite in my area for me, the Kona 11,5. If I lived on the Gulf, the Kona 1. If I was working with Britt, and had a bevy of Konas on tap, maybe the 11,5. It works fairly well on flat water too. You better work that one out with Britt. Also, that discussion we had about the Free Style, you'd be one of the few in the US that might to go that route. I used it briefly at Clearwater, it spins around super easy. You should probably discuss that with Steve. I think it may be worth a drive to go pick it up, or demo it. Maybe do so in coordination with the next shipment of the other stuff Britt gets from Aero/Exo. Your gas and time instead of freight charges. Just some ideas.

In sum. I like the Kona 1 for its broad applications, the 11,5 for my large carcass and lightwind waves, the 10,5 is for those punky side off days, or lighter weight sailors 160 lbs or less in a wavey venue. The Freestyle is a specialist board that probably rips up a wave just fine. The Kona Surf ought to be renamed Kona Jr. It is tough as the Kona 1, but at the price of having too much stuff on that small of a hull. The 10,5 has everything right about it by compare.
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JonTheSailorMan



Joined: 30 Jun 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cool thanks for the advice, i'll try that stuff out next time i get a chance. i'll talk to britt about those other konas too. are you going to be doing any more longboard videos? probly get alot more people interested.... maybe an instructional series for those of us new to wavesailing. eh? eh?
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2367

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2007 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

madmax7, in college all I seemed to have learned is to answer most questions with "it depends." LOL. You state your weight, and 5-12 mph as your light winds. How often are the winds sideshore? How often do they surprise the forecasters? How experienced are you at slogging out thru the impact zone?

It ain't easy to have cut and dried answers. The more trade wind scenarios you enjoy, the less board you may need. Esp with experience and what type of swells you may enjoy. 160 lbs is the best cut off I can generically come up with for doing the 10,5. All others ought to do the 11,5 Kona. The more onshore and small there is a need to go big even when going big...

Either choice is a winner based on the threshold of winds you most enjoy. I've come to the reality that I'm just too big (195) to own the 10,5 Kona. Plus, we get too many onshore ugly days to justify the 10,5. If I could get more days sideshore, I'd pick the smaller one. Been wave sailing for over 20 years, and don't mind the slog, and have done all too much not to do it well. They both wave sail and gybe like a dream.
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