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Mount a seat onto a big board for double-bladed paddling?
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20317

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2021 7:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Surfboards Reply with quote

From my post immediately above, I can see that what they call "prone" paddling is very rarely prone (at least for any distance), and that the problem with it would be ME, not the board. I can't lie on the floor and see 3 feet in front of me.

Also, I spent years on my knees inside my converted van on a very plush floor designed for exactly that. It felt great, but within a few seasons I had what an orthopedic nurse described as two kneecaps on one leg. Prognosis: live with it forever. Accidental cure: major fin impact directly on it.

windyjoe wrote:
Mike way before sups ever came around there were prone or kneeling on top surfboards guys used for training when it was flat no waves ask Art about something like that Question
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dllee



Joined: 03 Jul 2009
Posts: 5096
Location: East Bay

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2021 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EVA yoga block to prop your head up on extended paddles.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20317

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2021 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My neck simply won't bend that far back, passively or actively. I doubt it ever has. I can also easily see biting a lip or tongue off, cracking teeth, etc doing that on anything but absolute glass, whereas my goal would include playing in swell, which always includes chop. Then there's the oscillopsia which often accompanies Meniere's disease, including mine. One's eyes can't compensate for abrupt head motion, so any vibration, including blasting across chop on a WSer, blurs our vision to the point of uselessness.
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windward1



Joined: 18 Jun 2000
Posts: 1299

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2021 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Those are some tough parameters/specifications to work within. To avoid the vibration of chop, it seems like a hydrofoil is in order. However, you have to deal with the chop until flying on the foil. Sounds like you would be blinded prior to being steadied out and seeing well again. I do not see how you can get there from here. A Catch 22.

I would try the smooth water in that sanctuary near you and see how satisfying that is prior to working up to swell and chop. Start out with the highest probability of success and see how far you can comfortably take it.

The above paragraph is meant for trying some of the choices offered in the thread above. I am not advocating foiling right now.
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dmilovich



Joined: 19 Jul 2009
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2021 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Iso - Perhaps take a look at a surf ski kayak, but rigged with an ama for stability. Not cheap, but stable and fast. There are also OC-1 outrigger canoes that are almost as fast but better in rough waters, I’ve read. Both are “sit on top” and easy to remount if you go in the water, and the small cockpits are self-draining. Both are used in open ocean cruising. There are various constructions. I have no personal experience but have seen both at our local lakes. Jim Douglas, Florida marine scientist, windsurfer, SUP racer, who sometimes posts here knows about these first-hand.

Also, Hobie makes a sit on kayak that’s very stable for fishing and can be driven with a kayak paddle as well as foot pedals that run “flippers” underwater. I’ve seen those in action, and though not remotely as fast as the above, work well for getting around to explore or fish.

Since you are a long-time sailor, you could consider a Laser or a Sunfish as well.

Another idea, to get around the difficulty of putting watercraft on top of your RV would be an inflatable kayak. Good designs allow easy re-entry and can cruise OK.

Then there are rowing rigs, some of which are super stable, like Aldens, and pretty fast. But with rowing you are going backwards, which is weird. One design will strap onto a SUP and has a sliding seat. I have one and it’s quite stable on an old Mistral Equipe. But it’s a new skill to learn and at first takes a little balance, but not for long.

PS - don’t give up. You’re a lifelong waterman and something here will click for you to extend your career. Good luck.
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hilton08



Joined: 02 Apr 2000
Posts: 492

PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2021 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got one of these from Pepi at Pure Stoke before they sold out.

https://tahesport.com/us_tahe_en/10-6-beach-sup-yak-kayak-kit-inflatable-107252

Super light and stable and easy to pack up for transport.
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windswell



Joined: 20 May 2010
Posts: 208

PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2021 10:14 am    Post subject: Waveski or an inflatable kayak or coroplast kayak Reply with quote

I do a lot of waveski surfing (see waveski.com) and open-water sliding seat rowing and open water sit-on-top long kayaks. I've mounted a plastic bucket seat to my 32 pound, 12'6" Mistral Superlight. Worked and glided well, but a nuisance and you'll want foot braces.

In my experience, introducing rowing, kayaking and waveski surfing to windsurfing friends(age 50-6Cool, almost 50% were NOT able to comfortably sit and paddle or row (hamstrings, lower back, etc). Sit-on-stop ocean kayaks were more successful. So try for at least 60 minutes before you buy.

You can buy a cheap inflatable kayak new for $150, but at 9 feet, maybe no fin, it won't track or glide well. Weight 18 pounds. In general, a problem with the short inflatables is the excess width so your paddle blade is relatively far from the side of the boat, creating a zig zag path.

A long epoxy wavekski with a deep seat might be fun in reversing swell assuming you can physically climb back in after a capsize. But you're not likely to find one to demo . Not great glide. Weight 16 pounds.

For stability in any of these you want to be sitting low with foot or thigh braces to improve your paddle efficiency and workout and stability.

I've seen videos of the coroplast kayaks which look interesting. They have chines, so they'll track well. For flat water, they look great. And light.

A sliding seat beginner rowing shell used is a great full body workout. Try a rowing machine at a gym first. Then take a lesson on the water. Properly learned, they're very stable and fun. Expensive unless you find a beater used on Craigslist. I got a nice one for $200 with oars.
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