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Compact/Stubby Wave Boards..
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GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 2197

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first page of this thread about compact/stubby WAVE boards is excellent, and to the point. We get people talking from experience of being able to use them in the conditions for which they were intended, and can excel in, (as many found with the original Evo 74 way back), BUT, with words of caution from those (John in particular) who have to sail in wind and surf conditions for which bigger boards are far more appropriate.

In a nutshell, that is it! Stubby wave boards are not the best choice for all conditions, though more modern multi fin compact boards have closed the gap with many now preferring them for all round use. But much then depends on the skill and ability of the user.

That's why many of us 'lesser' experts find we are better served in our real world iffy wind and surf conditions by bigger more traditional boards (94 litre go to size) because we cannot keep those stubby boards afloat, and work well, in our difficult conditions. But good luck to those experts who can do so, and do! But, for goodness sake, those who don't, or can't make them work should stop claiming that the boards are at fault because of their own failings!
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capetonian



Joined: 11 Aug 2006
Posts: 1065
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GURGLETROUSERS wrote:
That's why many of us 'lesser' experts find we are better served in our real world iffy wind and surf conditions by bigger more traditional boards (94 litre go to size) because we cannot keep those stubby boards afloat, and work well, in our difficult conditions. But good luck to those experts who can do so, and do! But, for goodness sake, those who don't, or can't make them work should stop claiming that the boards are at fault because of their own failings!


94 L is tiny. I don't own a board that small, even for use with my 4.2.
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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 4835
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GURGLETROUSERS wrote:
The first page of this thread about compact/stubby WAVE boards is excellent, and to the point. We get people talking from experience of being able to use them in the conditions for which they were intended, and can excel in, (as many found with the original Evo 74 way back), BUT, with words of caution from those (John in particular) who have to sail in wind and surf conditions for which bigger boards are far more appropriate.

In a nutshell, that is it! Stubby wave boards are not the best choice for all conditions, though more modern multi fin compact boards have closed the gap with many now preferring them for all round use. But much then depends on the skill and ability of the user.

That's why many of us 'lesser' experts find we are better served in our real world iffy wind and surf conditions by bigger more traditional boards (94 litre go to size) because we cannot keep those stubby boards afloat, and work well, in our difficult conditions. But good luck to those experts who can do so, and do! But, for goodness sake, those who don't, or can't make them work should stop claiming that the boards are at fault because of their own failings!



A question, since you consider the EVO to fit into this category ?
I felt that the ORIGINAL question was addressed the newer boards , that near everyone is making now, so the past few years , so a rather square looking nose.
So is a certain length in a certain liter a stubby ? My Angulo Amigu was 224cm, a comparable size is now 214cm.
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GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 2197

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Capetonian - I didn't elaborate because I'm currently a bit stuck in the past, but what I meant was that my 2008 94 litre Exocet Cross board (241 x 60.5) is my go to all round board in decent strength, but very gusty winds and surfy seas which we frequently have to make do with. I'm tall but light (too much hill storming on the bike -but I love it) at just 143 pounds (no clothes) so the 94 board floats me adequately in the lulls. It's real virtue to me, over the much shorter stubby boards, is the directional stability it gives when struggling in chop to balance while waiting for a gust. Obviously, in lighter winds I go up in size (120 litres or 133) usually with a moderately sized 6.0 sail for easier balance control when slogging. In stronger winds my 2011 84 litre Exo Cross (or 84 JP FSW) both of which work down to 3.7 Combat sail size.

This may not sound radical by modern standards, but my days of chasing gales on small radical (so called sinker) wave boards are over. I'm now just turned 81, but still as keen as ever. (Just bought new Goya 4.5 wave sail and really impressed with it.)

U2 cubed - My Evo is the original 2005 74 litre board which at the time was called a stubby. (Amongst other things Laughing ) It was radically different to my older low volume Acid waveboard. It just shows how much boards have changed if the real stubby boards are now much shorter, and the Evo is now thought of as more traditional. So I don't know how to define a stubby. But does it matter when people know what works for them. I know what I like well enough.
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dllee



Joined: 03 Jul 2009
Posts: 3960
Location: East Bay

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Short stubs for radical turns, longer pintails for smoother carves. Both work just fine for the right rider.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18692

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More important than skill or ability (in any tool), IMO, is the rider's objectives. A world class expert at driving screws or aerial freestyle is gonna suck, at least for a while, if she's trying to drive a nail or loop a race board. That's why I keep asking posters what their objectives are (and to define their terms) before we can answer their questions. The problem isn't the tool; it's the tool's suitability for the purpose.

Conditions, including sea state, wind strength, wind quality, risk of being blown offshore, swim length, walk of shame difficulty, ego, are independently vital. Trying to force a tiny peg, or a floaty peg, or a stubby peg, or a long peg into a spiral hole will be decidedly difficult or downright unproductive. Just as a 120 L board is not "big" if one is simply blasting on flat water, a 75L board may be too big for extreme chop or maneuvers.

There ain't no best ANYTHING without establishing criteria.
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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 4835
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GT

I had the EVO. The Amigu came out in 2004 , really short for its day.

Was a fun board at 80L. THe EVO 74, less said the better.

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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18692

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IMO, the Evo 80 XTV was a classic example of a tool that was very right for its intended purpose and conditions (carving smooth, tilted surfaces under steady moderate power) and very clearly the most dangerous board I've ever owned in the presence of chop + gusts with the hammer down. Bought it unused in the year it was built for $400, sold it years later for $500 to a guy who sails it only in its ideal conditions. Win/win.
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ss59



Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Posts: 45

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

might be useful

https://youtu.be/zgmApcKhzto
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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 4835
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ss59 wrote:
might be useful

https://youtu.be/zgmApcKhzto


Some nice reflections there: esp the bump and jump , a stubby being useful.

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http://www.k4fins.com/fins.html
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