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Interesting comments from Naish
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beallmd



Joined: 10 May 1998
Posts: 1077

PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 11:24 am    Post subject: Interesting comments from Naish Reply with quote

From the design notes for the Starship all around board that I found interesting. I think most of us pretty much know this from experience but its interesting to see it from an expert in design. Naturally, personal experience and what works for you are part of it.


All boards on the market nowadays offer a lot of options when it comes to footstrap position and mast track. How can all those options be used to the riders advantage?
◾Stance width: with 4 insert holes, any rider has the chance to choose the right stance width for their size and riding style. The traditional stance width is measured for a 175 cm tall individual, meaning that this person would choose corresponding holes for the footstraps to start with. If you are taller, start moving your stance apart. If you are smaller, you have the option to decrease the distance.


◾Using strap position further forward or backwards: the closer your back foot is over the fin, the more agile the board will react. The more you stand forward, the more settled down the riding feel will be. Standing further backwards is usually beneficial for riders with more experience as they can get the most out of the board in terms of speed. Standing further forward helps alot if you are still learning to be secure in the footstraps or if you want the board to plane easier.


◾Personal reference: if you have no personal reference then start with the point above. Over time, you will develop a stance width that suits your style. For example, if you are mainly sailing in waves or rougher water, a wider stance will be more beneficial to you.


◾Inside and outside positioning: if you are sailing long stretches in a straight line, the outside positions will be more comfortable as the top of your foot won’t get overstretched. If you like to jibe and practice maneuvers, the inside position will be more comfortable. If you are just learning how to get into the straps, you will also find the inside position more comfortable in the beginning.


◾Mast track: moving the mast track further back will liven up the board while moving it further forward will settle it down. For example, if you are getting overpowered and the board gets harder to control, you can move the mast base a bit more forward which will settle things down. This is a great way to increase the range of the board even more in extreme situations.


◾A useful trick that actually has nothing to do with the board is also your boom height. Bring the boom further down and you will gain more control in overpowered conditions, as you will be applying more pressure on the mast base. Bring your boom further up and you will receive less pressure on the mast base and a looser riding feel.
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keycocker



Joined: 10 Jul 2005
Posts: 3525

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Naish told me he moves the boom up as the wind mounts to gain leverage over the sail. When control becomes an issue he starts back down again to increase mast foot pressure.

We use single bolt foots so we can change base position offshore. Wind drops you can move forward for easier planing and slogging, or working to windward.
All the way back for your last ride partly downwind at top speed.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14470

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keycocker wrote:
Naish told me he ... starts back down again to increase mast foot pressure.

Then I gotta believe it. But how does that work?
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windsrf



Joined: 01 May 1998
Posts: 182

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2014 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I'd always understood that higher boom results in more downward weight on the harness hook/line which should result in more mast foot pressure?

Also, adjusting a single screw mast base on the water is tricky, especially if you've already got it cranked down sufficiently. Plus, if you aren't careful with single screw you are at risk of rig separation - a complete disaster in the making.

David
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 1859
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never adjust your mast foot position off shore, suffer it out until you get back in, period, done, out.
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I don't drink the 'cool' aid, I drink tequila, it's more honest.
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beallmd



Joined: 10 May 1998
Posts: 1077

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sailed Kanaha for many years with a couple from Montreal. She would put the mast forward, sail up to the upper beach opposite Camp One, beach it and put the mast foot back for wave sailing. I guess that was a good call.
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Brian.bigfella@gmail.com



Joined: 11 Jun 2012
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
Never adjust your mast foot position off shore, suffer it out until you get back in, period, done, out.


Holy crap, can I back up this statement.

One day I started out at the Event Site, I was over by the White Salmon, "adjusted " my mast foot right out of the slot, and ended up at the Hatchery after 30 minutes or so of desperately trying to hold on to my board and rig at the same time in 5'+ breaking swells.

After trying about 100 times of trying to get the bolt back in the slot in strong winds and heavy swell I resigned myself to a long float. I'm fat and a crappy sailor, but I'm also 280 pounds and can climb 5.10c (if that means anything to you), so if you think you have more muscle to work that little tab back in, go for it. Otherwise, yeah, don't mess with it in the water.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 5966

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Never adjust your mast foot position off shore, suffer it out until you get back in, period, done, out."


Years ago, I learned that lesson. I won't go into the details, because it was one of the stupidest things I've ever done in windsurfing. Suffice to say, some things are more safely accomplished on dry land.
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keycocker



Joined: 10 Jul 2005
Posts: 3525

PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I misspoke. He just said he goes back down when control is an issue. He didn't mention mast foot pressure.
Iso can read my posts. Amazing.

Changing your mast foot offshore is a technique, like slogging or up hauling.
Knowing how to do it can save your ass.
That is why my whole crowd is good at it. We have no problem with separations.
We also raise and lower the boom offshore. I can do this standing up on a slalom board.
We rig our out hauls to change easily while swimming.
Thirty years of sailing away from a small island and spending hours far out teaches you things a near shore sailor might not do.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 5966

PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find dicking around with my stuff in the water is a pain in the ass. It's infinitely better to get things right before going out.

Outside of mastbase adjustment, I can easily make adjustments out in the water, but who wants to squirrel around in the water with your equipment as a sitting duck for the landlord. While wearing full wetsuits, we look an awful lot like seals. At some spots, particularly on the Central coast of California, you don't want to be hanging around in the water for too long.
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