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Endurance training for windsurfing (running, in particular)
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scargo



Joined: 19 May 2007
Posts: 270

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Given that the health benefits of walking are well established (and, as far as I know, unchallenged), it stands to reason that moderate running is good or even better. As for more serious running, while the study is a good reminder to do all things in moderation, it's important to not overread its findings.

First, 20 miles per week may be a joke for a marathoner, but to keep up that average year after year, well, that's probably more than 99% of Americans travel under their own power, walking or running. So the takeaway certainly shouldn't be that it's ok to be sedentary.

Second, I question the 8:00/mile cutoff, because one person's 8:00 pace might feel like another person's 6:00 pace. That is, the findings would be a lot more helpful if we could draw some conclusions about heart rate, i.e., how high and for how long.

Third, for me (a decent runner) it reinforces the importance of interval training. Born to Run says most of us run our long runs too fast and our short runs too slow. And if one is concerned about piling up too many miles in a week, heading to the track for speed work is a great solution.

On that note, I find that McMillan's running calculator is a great way to figure out the proper training paces, as well as predict what my pace will be for given distances:

http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/calculator
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14338

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

slinky wrote:
1. The way I see it exercise should be enjoyable, not self inflicted punishment. I see runners all the time who appear to be punishing themselves by the look on their face.

2. If it does'nt feel good don't do it.

1. I canít count how many times Iíve seen someone ďsloggingĒ (slow, pained jogging) down the sidewalk on a hot afternoon, scowling like a 5-yo being forced to eat overcooked Brussels sprouts, every step looking like it might be his/her last. I feel like pulling over, walking up to them, and making two life-altering suggestions:
A. Find a sport so much fun you canít tear yourself away from it.
B. Read some exercise books and learn why youíre likely doing more harm than good.

When I see a true runner blazing down a trail for miles on end with joy on his/her face and a spring in his step at 105 or 20 degrees, I know s/he has found (A), but still want to suggest (B) to them.

2. That one worked for me when I played on many toys most days year Ďround, but now that I donít have that luxury, I must hit the gym during the winter. And since the only rep that builds strength is the one we absolutely cannot physically or mentally finish with proper form and the most beneficial steps are the ones that drive our pulse and breathing into the stratosphere, I canít say it feels good. However, each takes < 10 minutes per week of actual effort, so the anguish is short and I keep telling myself how much good Iím doing myself, as measured by meticulous gym and medical records and the complete absence of aches and pains. The study I mentioned earlier, however, leaves me wondering whether the HIT approach I pursue does the same harm implicated in the study. My doctors say no, but they canít see heart muscle calcification without high-tech imaging Ö and one of them just took up marathon running.
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cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 1286
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, if that were the case I really would be middle aged ;*)

I expect nothing, hope to make it to about 90, but since my high school chums all figured I'd be dead by 30, it's all gravy (with or without
exercise).

-Craig

GURGLETROUSERS wrote:

At anyrate, I aim and expect to live to 100! Wink
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14338

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

slinky wrote:
I walk briskly 4-6 miles a day

After a rotator cuff injury two years ago I stopped going to the gym, and now I tire much more quickly. My shoulder is nearly 100% now

The underlying questions there are "What specific muscle was torn?", followed by "What specific exercises will best heal and strengthen that muscle?". In addition, many middle aged or older people, including those who remain very active, have atrophying supraspinatus muscles, part of the rotator cuff and a primary scapula/shoulder stabilizer. Recent studies on its rehabilitation revealed that the specific exercises usually recommended for that muscle are not optimal, because they also recruit/enlist/invoke/activate the deltoid, which shoulders (that's a pun, but accurate) most of the load while the true target muscle goes along for the ride, as CoachG points out.

I feel sort of silly lifting a 2# dumbbell in each hand (working up to a truly impressive 3#-5# later in the program), but I just keep thinking "supraspinatus". (I also keep watching the guys grimacing in genuine pain as they jerk huge barbells around, threatening themselves and anyone else in range.)

LSD, such as walking 4-6 miles a day in the street or on a treadmill, does burn some calories, but it also teaches our bodies to shed heart muscle and other high-demand oxygen-delivering systems. We need sprints, such as in interval training, to tell it otherwise.
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noshuzbluz



Joined: 18 May 2000
Posts: 777

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:

LSD, such as walking 4-6 miles a day in the street or on a treadmill, does burn some calories, but it also teaches our bodies to shed heart muscle and other high-demand oxygen-delivering systems. We need sprints, such as in interval training, to tell it otherwise.


Played racket ball on LSD 30+ years ago. That proved to be quite entertaining! Shocked

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KevinDo



Joined: 02 Jul 2012
Posts: 423
Location: Cabrillo Inside

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Been running sub 5:30 miles for most of my runs (2 runs a day). I take a long break from running though during the summer. If you have good form in running your knees wont hurt so much Very Happy Not many people ever use proper form or even the right shoes!
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14338

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

noshuzbluz wrote:
Played racket ball on LSD 30+ years ago. That proved to be quite entertaining!

To you, or to observers? Sounds like a YouTube winner.
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noshuzbluz



Joined: 18 May 2000
Posts: 777

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:
noshuzbluz wrote:
Played racket ball on LSD 30+ years ago. That proved to be quite entertaining!

To you, or to observers? Sounds like a YouTube winner.


HA! We were totally oblivious to anything else but that bright blue ball zipping around that white room. Good thing there was no YouTube then!

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zirtaeb



Joined: 03 Jul 2009
Posts: 2413

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

30 years of shortboard high performance windsurfing, and only ONCE, was ever a good windsurfer who was a good runner during his windsurfing years.
I'd guess DeanKarnazes could be considered a good runner.
There was another SBay windsurfer who followed in his footsteps in Ultramarathons, but sorry, I forgot his name.
Lots of windsurfers ran for exercise and fitness, but they were mediocre windsurfers at best.
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zirtaeb



Joined: 03 Jul 2009
Posts: 2413

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, lots of windsurfers use the gym to stay fit. Some very good expert pro windsurfers did that, and are doing it.
That is different from running, although they do run on the machines.
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