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PROOF: Obama IS the end of the free world
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 5371

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have no difficulty in admitting that Romney performed better than Obama, particularly for those "low information" voters. But I have a little more difficulty in seeing him as the answer, irrespective of his lies. Let's look at his touted performance in Massachusetts:




Quote:

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October 5, 2012


Romney Claims of Bipartisanship as Governor Face Challenge

By MICHAEL WINES


BOSTON — He came into office with a mandate to shake things up, an agenda laden with civics-book reforms and a raging fiscal crisis that threatened to torpedo both. He sparred with a hostile legislature and suffered a humiliating setback in the midterm elections. As four years drew to a close, his legacy was blotted by anemic job growth, sagging political popularity and — except for a landmark health care overhaul bill — a record of accomplishment that disappointed many.

That could be the Barack Obama that Mitt Romney depicted in Wednesday’s presidential debate as an ineffective and overly partisan leader. But it could also be Mitt Romney, who boasted of a stellar record as Massachusetts governor, running a state dominated by the political opposition.

Mr. Romney did score some successes beyond his health care legislation, notably joining a Democratic legislature to cut a deficit-ridden budget by $1.6 billion and revamping a troubled school building fund. Some outside experts and former aides say his administration excelled at the sorts of nuts-and-bolts efficiencies that make bureaucracies run better, like streamlining permit approvals and modernizing jobs programs.

As a Republican governor whose legislature was 87 percent Democratic, Mr. Romney said in Wednesday’s debate, “I figured out from Day 1 I had to get along, and I had to work across the aisle to get anything done.” The result, he said, was that “we drove our schools to be No. 1 in the nation. We cut taxes 19 times.”

But on closer examination, the record as governor he alluded to looks considerably less burnished than Mr. Romney suggested. Bipartisanship was in short supply; Statehouse Democrats complained he variously ignored, insulted or opposed them, with intermittent charm offensives. He vetoed scores of legislative initiatives and excised budget line items a remarkable 844 times, according to the nonpartisan research group Factcheck.org. Lawmakers reciprocated by quickly overriding the vast bulk of them.

The big-ticket items that Mr. Romney proposed when he entered office in January 2003 went largely unrealized, and some that were achieved turned out to have a comparatively minor impact. A wholesale restructuring of state government was dead on arrival in the legislature; an ambitious overhaul of the state university system was stillborn; a consolidation of transportation fiefs never took place.

Mr. Romney lobbied successfully to block changes in the state’s much-admired charter school program, but his own education reforms went mostly unrealized. His promise to lure new business and create jobs in a state that had been staggered by the collapse of the 2000 dot-com boom never quite bore fruit; unemployment dropped less than a percentage point during his four years, but for most of that time, much of the decline was attributed to the fact that any new jobs were being absorbed by a shrinking work force.

Mr. Romney won lawmakers’ consent to streamline a tangled health and human services bureaucracy, but the savings amounted to but $7 million a year. He entered office considering an eight-state compact to battle climate change, but left office outside the consortium, saying it cost too much.

“He put on the table in his inaugural address, and then in his budget, a series of proposed reforms like civil service reform, pension reform — going right to the heart of the lion’s den,” Michael Widmer, president of the nonpartisan Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, said in an interview. But excepting health care, “he never followed up. There was a handful of successes, but there was never a full-blown or focused program in the sense of saying, ‘Here’s our vision.’ ”

Mr. Romney’s former aides vigorously disagree.

“That’s an overwrought type of critique,” said Timothy Murphy, the health and human services secretary under Mr. Romney. “If you take a look at the things the governor set out to do, we accomplished a lot. The budgets were more than balanced — we generated surpluses.”

And, he said, “We did pass the most consequential piece of health care legislation in this state in 25 years.”

Mr. Romney was pushing on an open door on the 2006 initiative — Democrats had long dreamed of providing health coverage to almost every resident.

Jane Edmonds, who headed the state’s Labor and Workforce Development agency, recounted a meeting at the start of Mr. Romney’s term in which he handed out a list of campaign promises to his staff and ordered them carried out within four years.

“My opinion is that he delivered on almost all those promises,” she said. “We had 8 or 10 of them and we carried them all out.”

Some of Mr. Romney’s harshest critics concede his competence and his grasp of Massachusetts’ problems and needs. Many of the initiatives he took into office were arguably nonpartisan; he brought to the job the same gimlet-eyed scrutiny of costs and revenues that he employed as an investment manager to spot potentially profitable companies.

But in contrast to his statements in the debate, many say, Mr. Romney neither mastered the art of reaching across the aisle nor achieved unusual success as governor. To the contrary, they say, his relations with Democrats could be acrimonious, and his ability to get big things done could be just as shackled as is President Obama’s ability to push his agenda through a hostile House of Representatives.

Mr. Romney could be appealing and persuasive, they say. But he also could display a certain political tone-deafness and a failure to nurture the constituencies he needed to make his initiatives succeed.

Mr. Romney promoted his record on Wednesday as a bipartisan leader by noting that he met regularly with the Democratic leadership of the Massachusetts legislature. But that apparently was not enough to keep afloat a relationship that had been rancorous from the beginning.

In the opening months of his tenure, Mr. Romney vetoed a House plan to create new committees and raise legislative pay, and the legislators rejected his flagship proposal, a nearly 600-page plan to overhaul the state bureaucracy. “They had a deteriorating relationship during the first two years,” said Jeffrey Berry, a political science professor and expert on state politics at Tufts University.

Mr. Romney proved to have a taste for vetoes, killing legislative initiatives in his first two years at more than twice the rate of his more popular Republican predecessor, William F. Weld, The Boston Globe reported in 2004.

Some seemed almost designed to rankle legislators: one rejected an increase in disability payments to a police officer who had slipped on an ice patch. Others reflect his ramrod-straight views on ethics and government waste — knocking down a special pension deal for a state legislator; rejecting a subsidy to Medicaid payments so nursing homes could provide kosher meals to Jewish residents.

“He seemed to take great delight in vetoing bills,” recalled his director of legislative affairs, John O’Keefe. "Some of the bills we would chuckle when we wrote the veto message.”

By 2004, the second year of his term, Mr. Romney was provoked enough to mount an unprecedented campaign to unseat Democratic legislators, spending $3 million in Republican Party money and hiring a nationally known political strategist, Michael Murphy, to plan the battle.

The effort failed spectacularly. Republicans lost seats, leaving them with their smallest legislative delegation since 1867. Democratic lawmakers were reported to have been deeply angered by the campaign’s tactics.

On close scrutiny, some of the bipartisan successes that Mr. Romney claimed in the Wednesday debate turn out to by peppered with asterisks.

On education, Mr. Romney was correct in stating that Massachusetts students were ranked first in the nation during his tenure. Students in grades four and eight took top honors in reading and mathematics on the 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress.

However, educators largely credit an overarching reform of state schools 10 years earlier under Governor Weld. The reforms doubled state spending on schools and brought standards and accountability to administrators and students.

“Governor Romney does not get to take the credit for achieving that No. 1 ranking,” said Mike Gilbert, field director for the nonprofit Massachusetts Association of School Committees, “but it did happen while he was in office.”

Mr. Romney’s claim that he was responsible for 19 separate tax cuts is also technically accurate, but not the full story. In 2005, for example, Mr. Romney’s administration wrote legislation refunding $250 million in capital gains taxes — but the bill came only in response to a court ruling that the taxes had been illegally withheld in 2002.

Many of the other tax cuts were first proposed by the legislature, not Mr. Romney, and others were routine extensions of existing tax reductions or were one-day sales tax holidays.


Michael Barbaro contributed reporting.
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 1808
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You'd might be taken more seriously if you'd provide a source link with your posts when you quote soembody, but you rarely do.
Try it sometime.
You keep claiming that my sources are from Drudge, but all the links that I have provided, never say "Drudge Report", and they are always clickable, just so you could check to see if anything was edited out.

And you'd like everybody to "get their fair share" oops, I mean "shot", as BHO would say.
If you are going to be a hard core poster, do it properly.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
And you'd like everybody to "get their fair share"

The penultimate principle of Karl Marx.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 5371

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you kidding me? New York Times, October 7, reprinted in yesterday's Chronicle. You should try sources that are required to fact check sometime. I gave you the author and the full article. Iso would tear you a new one for laziness.
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pueno



Joined: 03 Mar 2007
Posts: 2707

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

isobars wrote:
nw30 wrote:
And you'd like everybody to "get their fair share"

The penultimate principle of Karl Marx.

And this from the guy who gets MORE than his fair share, someone who benefits from Marx's penultimate principle all the while slamming Marx.



mac wrote:
Are you kidding me? New York Times, October 7, reprinted in yesterday's Chronicle. You should try sources that are required to fact check sometime. I gave you the author and the full article. Iso would tear you a new one for laziness.

Mikey's smart enough to know that the oversight had nothing to do with laziness but everything to do with an attempt at a mindless insult.

Even nw30 knows how to Google "Michael Barbaro contributed reporting."

The first hit is your NYT article.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 5371

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NW--like most right wing hacks, you have no trouble making up dialogue and assigning it to progressives that actually didn't say it ("fair share"). But did you notice this?

Quote:
On education, Mr. Romney was correct in stating that Massachusetts students were ranked first in the nation during his tenure. Students in grades four and eight took top honors in reading and mathematics on the 2003 National Assessment of Educational Progress.

However, educators largely credit an overarching reform of state schools 10 years earlier under Governor Weld. The reforms doubled state spending on schools and brought standards and accountability to administrators and students.
“Governor Romney does not get to take the credit for achieving that No. 1 ranking,” said Mike Gilbert, field director for the nonprofit Massachusetts Association of School Committees, “but it did happen while he was in office.”


Reward the uninvolved?

On tone deafness, Romney went before the NAACP, which favors neighborhood school, and thinks that the "choice" movement is about cherry-picking students away from public schools--and was surprised by the hostile reaction. Tell me again how he understands the educational reform needs of this country. Or maybe just tell me about the rabbits again.
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 3615
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coboardhead wrote:
I agree Boggsman. I also agree with Mrgybe...Politics is getting tiring. Time to vote early, load up the gear, and hit the road. Smile

Dont tell me you're going to Baha, thats downright unfair to us working stiffs!
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stevenbard



Joined: 11 Nov 1993
Posts: 4231

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Warning: Because El Nino has just begun, it seems there is no High Pressure anywhere near California or Baja. My buddy on Maui said it's been calm over there too. We are in full fall mode with no wind. How about up north?

The valium kicked in after the last debate! Very Happy
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 14322

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevenbard wrote:
We are in full fall mode with no wind. How about up north?

For west winds, I've got to guess this has been the lamest fall I've seen. I don't remember getting on the water but about two hours since early September, and that was an evening gamble that paid off with a short 6.2 session.

There have been many windy east wind days, but ya gotta be there (or at least within a quick driving distance) to catch them, as it takes a consistent 30 to create good swell, and that's fleeting and very hard to forecast. I'm sure the slalom guys who don't mind flat water, and who live close enough to make a couple of hours worth the drive, have had a good or even great past 2-3 weeks. Swell snobs who live a couple or hours away, however, have gotten burned by strong forecasts that didn't come through and by weak forecasts that blew hard, at least for a few hours.

And, oh, yes ... I usually sail in board shorts and a 1mm neo vest for 2-3 months in a good summer; I got a week of that this year, with only one day w/o neoprene.
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keycocker



Joined: 10 Jul 2005
Posts: 3460

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The next meeting the Other Romney attended after the NAACP was in private.
He said he "tried to reason with the blacks.All they want is a free ride..."
Let's see..NAACP....rich influential Black community leaders who are not on welfare and support GOP candidates at times.

I think the New Romney is much more electable.
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