myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Windsurfing Videos Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
luff vs boom length
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
KevinDo



Joined: 02 Jul 2012
Posts: 412
Location: Cabrillo Inside

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beaglebuddy wrote:
I've learned waterstarting on an 8M, there is so much less energy expended compared to uphauling. But I have a longboard and can rest the boom on the tail which really helps a lot, I don't think you can do that on any modern shortboards especially when the boom is all the way at the top of the cut out in my case.
I'm currently considering a 10M no cam sail and if I buy it I will get one of those foam pads that straps to the clew to float it, also an impact vest to help float my body.
Uphauling an 10 or 12M sail seems like it would be very strenuous.


I cant imagine the pain of uphauling a 10...Id pray the winds stay strong so I could water start it lol. Still getting a 10 to fly just sounds painful
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 1336

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 3:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughed out loud at the quote that waterstarting and uphauling huge multi cammed sails is kind of a right of passage for young strong guys. I think we've all been there, and weren't we great. Wink

Biggest sail now is a grunty twin cammed 8.0, with a longish boom for lightish winds and long board use. Boy, can it give some grief if it lands wrongly in the water, and is pushed right under. Trying to fly the thing for waterstarting in a lightish iffy breeze and bouncy sea, especially if the cams are the wrong side of the mast, is cursing central!

Lifting the mast (without drowning) almost guarantees a gust will push the clew down and sink the whole thing again. Can't imagine trying to waterstart a huge 12 metre contraption in such conditions.

Of course, I'm sure some magnificent specimen of manhood (we know who) will pooh pooh it all, and tell us 'old farts' how easily he manages 11.0 metre sails on his formula board in near gales! (Before whining about ridiculous long boards being so heavy that he hasn't got the necessary strength to lift one onto his roof rack!)

No! No more multi cammed sails for this oldie. I want to enjoy windsurfing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2402

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 4:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i pump to plane my 9 meter sail on my windSUP 11'8" board in some pretty light winds. those that suppose it is a bitch to water start an 8+ meter sail, but may not have done so may be doing those that may have to a disservice. how would you know if you haven't done it? why would you say such discouraging things? this cultural prevalence of snubbing big gear is part of why our sport has died. please stop contributing to our sport's demise.

i've water started 11's and bigger. typically that's when the wind is quite strong and steady. also depends on whether i've fallen off the board or not as well. i'm 50 years young.

sad to see so many kiters that lambasted windsurfing for having to use "big gear" sailing 20 meter foil kites. sadder yet is to see them become beach volley ball players or couch potatoes when they have their kite mares when their "not so giant" kites fall from the sky in puffy light winds.

the wind came up yesterday out of nowhere. no one in my county sailed but me. if that ain't a signal that we need to encourage everyone to sail more than nothing is.

_________________
www.aerotechsails.com
www.exocet-original.com
www.iwindsurf.com
http://www.epicgearusa.com/
http://powerexmasts.com/?page_id=72
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 1998

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

165 lb sailor, double luff 10.0 meter race sail. No great strength required.

Water start needs-Impact/flotation vest, flat water & patience. Swim to the tip & work your way down the mast until you fly the clew. If chop is too big, wind too light or no flotation device, go to up haul.

Up haul needs-Easy up haul & patience. In the Cal Cup races out in the bay you can watch scrawny little teenage kids up haul 8+ meter sails with an easy up haul. All you need is a little rope tied to your up haul that you can hook up to your harness. Lean back & relax.

Coachg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 1452

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Water starting big sails -

I am 67 and weigh 167 lbs. I have been sailing with at least a 10m sail for 25 years and have had an 11m for 6 years. All my race sails, 6.6, 7.6, 8.4, 9.2 & 11.0 have cams and large luffs. The Maui Sails sails are designed to minimize water flow into the luff, so they don't flood and stay pretty dry for 30 seconds or more. The good news is that on formula boards, with intermediate to advanced skills, it is rare for a sailor to drop a big sail in the water. Serious formula sailors don't carry uphauls.

However, dropping it in the water does happen, and if the sail is downwind, I immediately uphaul. If it is upwind and still on the surface, I will try water starting if I can fly it within 10 seconds or so. This is easier than uphauling and flipping it to the downwind side of the board unless the wind is too light to water start.

Strong winds make water starting easier, but also make uphauling harder (wind keeps the sail flat on the water), so I have "easy-up-hauls" on my three largest sails. Unless you are a gorilla, get an easy up haul.

I use my three smaller race sail 6.6, 7.6, 8.4 on my slalom board (108 liters) and water start when there is enough wind and uphaul when there isn't. Again, I will water start if the sail is upwind and most commonly uphaul if the sail is downwind.

One of the "pain in the ass" issues with cammed sails is if you are trying to water start and the cams are rotated on the wrong side of the mast, popping them to the other side is really hard. A lot of punching, cussing and sinking, but it can be done. The other option is go the other way, but flying the sail with the foil upside down and turning the board 180 degrees takes some effort.

Why do I use cammed sails? They are fast, stable and have a great wind range (adjustable outhauls). Plus they are easy and faster to rig & de-rig than many no cam sails (Maui Sails, I can't speak for the others).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GURGLETROUSERS



Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 1336

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was partly tongue in cheek. Of course I can light wind waterstart but I seriously question the assumption that sails of over 8.0 metres in size have brought newbies into our sport. More the reverse considering how expensive huge rigs have become!

It was always recognised in tighter leech days that, once you went above 8.0 in size you sacrificed throw about ability, and the joy of sailing, for a little extra lower wind planing ability.

If big modern sails have now changed that perception isn't that because they are 'geared' towards their upper wind range by using extra twist and floppy leeches, which makes them no more powerful in the lower wind range than the smaller older sails? Yet you still have the huge size and equally huge cost involved in using them, so why would I need one?

My 8.0 twin cam is an older tighter leeched sail with masses of camber and low end grunt. If I'm sure it will be a day of light winds I don't see how I'm losing out by using it on my longboards. If it is windier and I still want to use a longboard, I use a modern North twin cam, or even a lighter more 'flicky abouty' 7.0 rotational. They work just fine.

I still maintain that a good modern longboard, and good moderate sized rig will more to entice Joe public to take up our sport of windsurfing, than any other combination of gear. Once hooked, then they can 'do' formula, or whatever.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Page 7 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group