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windsurfing related injuries
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll do that.

Google's first result not provided by Power Plate was
http://tinyurl.com/9ydt9gs ,
which is quite negative on Power Plate.

The next non-PP hit said its benefit lies in keeping football players' muscles warmer during halftime, lessening their second half performance degradation.

The third non-commercial hit, http://tinyurl.com/967jaca , was, overall, another vote against PP because of its dubious benefit and potential harm.

I've used both PP briefly (for rehab) and Body Blades (for rehab and conditioning), and found the latter to fry my muscles much more effectively.

The TRX approach is a whole 'nuther ball game, with obvious benefits. Everyone should try that out at whatever level they feel comfortable with. I did that and similar exercises on a wide variety of weighted cables, TRX straps, trapeze, monkey bars, etc. for four, sometimes six, hours continuously 3 days a week for several winters. My gym's professional football and hockey team trainers, bodybuilding and powerlifting competitors and trainers, and one med student/trainer/athlete constantly kidded me -- often not kidding -- about the intensity, duration, and even the risk level of my TRX and related exercises. Some of my more imaginative exercises worried them, but they added so much fun and variety and/or useful benefit that I kept on doing them. Two examples of the ones that worried trainers (and probably the gym lawyer) are pullups hanging inverted from fixed cables and a variety of exercises combining plyometrics with weighted cables to produce big flying leaps which had the trainers calling me "Superman" as they scrambled to clear the area over a 10-foot radius. Those are about as close to jumping a windsurfer as I can simulate in the gym and fry most muscles plus my oxygen delivery system to 100% of their theoretical capacity. It's just one of many exercises I do in the gym to drive my pulse and respiration rates well beyond 100% of the old-fashioned "220-your age" guidelines.

Just thinking about cranking up the volume and beat of the iPod music in my ears to drown out the noise of my maxed-out heartbeat and breathing effort elevates both a bit and makes me want to get back in the gym before the WSing season ends. It's really a kick in the ass to read a book on serious fitness training, try an exercise the book says is the pinnacle of its whole program, and find that I can do it not only well, but in some cases easily even today ... despite having been born during WW II. One core training book said its toughest challenge was doing pushups in the TRX cables, without the straps touching our body except at the hands, with feet elevated well above head level, on only one foot with the other leg raised in the air, with a rigid, straight body. It was so simple I don't waste time on it.

To the peanut gallery: that's not about me, and it's not boasting. It's an attempt to motivate more people to get off the couch and away from the old-fashioned, boring, hazardous (oops!), almost always incorrectly performed rut/routines most gym rats do and most trainers teach. I've asked many trainers about Superslow and TRX and interval training and Tabatas and lifting to total failure and other such gutbusters, and every one has said something like, "Well, of course those are superior, but almost none of our clients (it's a big gym with clientele from 10 to 100 years old) are willing to work that hard, even for 15-30 minutes per week."

As you know, Ron, that's their loss. But be careful ... every time I try a new bunch of exercises to maintain both interest and benefit, my 69-yo tendons and muscles find one or two specific exercises they do not like. I had to abandon plyometric pushups, in which both hands and both feet leave the floor as high as possible with every pushup, because they inflamed my knees and shoulders. We gotta use some common sense to separate the things we must ease into from those we really shouldn't be doing at all. And as you know, our bodies adapt to any exercise routine within just several weeks, greatly diminishing its effectiveness so that we not only stop gaining but even lose ground unless we find new ways to challenge our bodies. A friend who has done the same Nautilus routine for decades is wasting away to just skin and bones.

Anything we can do to make workouts less boring and stultifying will help motivate and benefit us.
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Soapbox on, for the benefit of anyone interested.
ronm41 wrote:
I most certainly don't research ... Doesn't need to be complicated. Going to a good trainer is worth more than reading books as they have first hand experience but of course like going to a good car mechanic the trainer needs to be good.

If I HAD done even the most basic cancer reading -- just the most elemental stuff everyone should know before they reach 40 -- my life expectancy would be another 24 years. Instead, I trusted my primary care physician, whose incompetence we now know let my cancer spread for two to three years before he even notified me of it. Result: Today I can sail HARD for 10 hours in one day in raging 3.5 conditions, but I expect to be incapacitated within 5 years and dead within 7.

Do your own homework, as your life may lie in the balance (and don't trust the VA with anything a bandaid won't fix).

Isolated incident? Nope. Upon recurrence, two radiation oncologists swore their treatment gave me 75% odds of cure with 5% odds of side effects. Before acting, I did my own homework and proved with >300 peer-reviewed medical journal studies that they were outright full of shit. In fact, my cure odds are <0.18 and immediate, permanent, completely debilitating side effects are virtually guaranteed. F those docs, F their mainstream treatment, F most doctors, and F the VA.

Do your own homework, or else.

I caught a nurse about to inject me with a dose that would have put me in immediate anaphylactic shock.

Another nurse gave me enough central nervous system depressant, while I was on morphine, to put my life at risk. I had to forcefully refuse such a large dose even after her smaller one completely paralyzed me.

Two nurses have refused to believe my bladder was blocked. I had to drag my drugged post-surgical ass out of bed, fix the problem myself, flood their damned floor ... TWICE ... to convince them I knew what the hell I was talking about.

Three VA physicians refused to believe that statins often cause muscle pain. In fact, that's been accepted knowledge since the '90s, is extremely common in strength building exercisers, and can kill.

I had to diagnose for myself the cause of my decades-long balance problems after five neurologists posited that I had just 3-5 days to live ... in 1996.

I could go in for pages just from my own experience.

Every one of you: Do your own damned homework. Quit reading fricking novels, watching the Kardashians (whoever they are), partying every chance you get, and yucking it up as though the the damned government -- or doctors, or gym trainers, or lawyers, or used car salesmen, or mechanics, or politicians -- will take care of you from cradle to grave. None of them will if you don't take life seriously enough to learn enough to separate the snake oil peddlers from the competent providers and to know when even the good ones slip up.

I'm done for now. Everybody back to their Facebook, ball games, and beer. I'm getting back to medical and insurance literature homework in the hopes of squeezing some decent care out of the medical field and getting some more realistic coverage of my medical bills from at least one of the four insurance providers I pay for.

Soapbox off.

Send? Delete? Send? Delete? Send? Delete? Crap ... SEND; maybe it will help someone.
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ronm41



Joined: 02 May 2007
Posts: 172

PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2012 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yikes, sounds like it wasn't your time to die. I have my own cancer stories since I have had two bouts of serious cancer with the last bout just 9 mos ago. Both cancers were not related. So, I just finished 35 radiation treatments two months ago in my neck and throat and lost 35 pounds as I couldn't eat for long periods of time as my throat was scorched and I had to gargle with a numbing agent just to drink water. This was after major surgery removing tonsils and all my neck lymph nodes. But I am happy with the outcome and the work of my docs. So I can relate to your story. Getting back to training, for me using the power plate is a accessory and a part of my plan as I primarially do circuit training by combining various exercise together and the vibrating plate is great for doing planks, deep squats, lunges, pushups ect ect as it really fatigues you in a hurry so there is a lot of work done in a short period of time without having a lot of sets. Probably not best used as a primary source of a program. Anyway, I am on a kinda rehab mode and love thge feeling of my body recovering. Windsurfing pretty good too it is a lot different sailing at 170 as opposed to 210. Maybe a full meter in sail size.
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That'll teach you to smoke!
Just kidding, under the presumption that you didn't, given your workout ethic.
I also had two unrelated cancers, one of them saving my life because its workup uncovered the other, far more urgent one. "Life's a bitch, and then you jibe", as the T shirt says. At least we play and exercise addicts cram several ordinary lives' worth of fit fun into our time here; it beats the hell out of waiting for the world to entertain us as we melt into a recliner.

If you're interested in dramatically reducing the time you spend working out while significantly increasing your results, check out this site:
http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/?page_id=2

His books (available in any bookstore) and videos are well supported by research, his principles go back to Arthur Jones whose slow lifting training principles produced many world champion body builders including the one who dethroned Arnold, and even proceeding to total whole-body muscle failure produces thorough fatigue but not soreness ... AFTER one recovers from the first few sessions. Even after years of it, I still can't walk upright away from four leg press reps because every fast and slow twitch muscle below my waist is completely depleted. Bonuses: no blood pressure elevation, zero injury rate, serious aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, far less joint strain, no warmup needed, only one set per muscle group, progress very easily and accurately measured, only 5 exercises fries virtually all our muscles in 12 minutes, and its training effect is so thorough that doing it again within a week (up to two weeks with many individuals, especially highly motivated pros) is counterproductive.

When all of you exercisers, athletes, coaches, and trainers stop laughing, check out the book and/or the website and decide for yourselves. I've been as impressed by it as have the many college and professional sports teams who have switched to one slow-lifting protocol or another. Heads up: Superslow newbies will hurt for days, while experienced hands at it will feel OK within hours (but weaker for many days, which is why I don't do it during WSing season). One 12-minute session of this, done right, is tougher than a week of the usual gym crap we see just about everybody else doing in the gym. It's safe and very effective for 80-something heart patients and Ashton Eaton alike because it's all about relative level of effort rather than pounds or reps.
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ronm41



Joined: 02 May 2007
Posts: 172

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that link, I am always interested in approaches to exercise and workouts. For me I have a gym at my house and I like working out daily so my approach is not that intense but I do some failure drills but only once or twice a week. So most of my work is awarm up for sailing and biking. Right now I am only about 70% but I did train as much as I could during all my cancer surgery and radiation. So with my reduced body weight I am still pretty muscular but more like rope. My goal is to weigh around 185 to start ski season. I talked to my doc last week and we agreed that there is no rush to gain weight but just add a few pounds a month. As far as my throat cancer, nonsmoker for sure. I had Squamous cell carcinoma with a Papilloma component. the causes are uncertain but according to my doc there is a epidemic of this kind of cancer in the US and he personally has five cases he is treating. He said maybe veneral disease connection. So, there is probably good reason why getting the Papilloma vaccine is important as a youth. He also said that this cancer is very treatable so my odds are pretty good. My first cancer five years ago was breast cancer and I had surgery and chemo for that. Seems like I am over that as I am beyond five years which is a mile stone. Any lessons? yeah, don't have oral sex with skanky women you pickup at a bar and stay away from anabolic steriods Shocked
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ronm41 wrote:
My first cancer five years ago was breast cancer

I gotta wonder how many guys here were surprised to hear that men get breast cancer.

Sorry, Embo and others here for exercise tips, but if you ignore the paragraphs about cancer, there's still a lot of exercise information here.

Mike \OO/
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sailingjoe



Joined: 06 Aug 2008
Posts: 1087

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

noshuzbluz wrote:
I thought that waking up the next morning feeling like someone snuck in our room and beat the crap out of me was just part of it! Damn maybe I should work out more... :shock:
isobras wrote:
I've always described it as having been hit by a padded bus. For many people it involves soreness or even pain, while for others it feels more like numbing whole-body physical fatigue. I don't know about the former, but the cure for the latter involves at least three things: fluids, carbs, and getting back on the horse. We could have prevented much of it by gobbling down plenty of fluids plus simple carbs and proteins in a 4:1-5:1 ratio (non-fat chocolate milk is as good as whey and carb supplements) within 15 minutes of the last set or reach, then keeping up the proteins on a specific schedule for a couple of days.
Wow. I got hit by that bus last night and am still tangled in the wheels today. It was a moderate session with the 11 meter formula sail and board. With this dearth of wind here on Cape Cod, I should be thankful I was able to sail at all. Sometimes I wonder if the sense of accomplishment when I nail every gybe and wind up suffering such pain really makes the sport worth the effort. However, there's nothing like London Dry Gin to make it feel better. I drink plenty of Gatorade before sessions and actually all during my day, everyday. This has stopped the cold water cramping for sure. I also will eat powerbars if I have not had much of a lunch for afternoon sessions. Two nights ago I powerloaded on carbs with a pasta meal. Nevertheless, as far as I can determine, and this has been figured over decades of sports activities, if you don't put in the regular sessions at least three times a week, you are going to get hit by the padded bus often. Futhermore, the older you are, the more it will twist you into writhing, withering pain and screaming agony. I find it great that Isobras will go into the why's a wherefore's of the phenomenon in such great detail, but the reality would be that it's like that Carl Sandberg poem regarding the Learned Astronomer.
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xander.arch



Joined: 23 Apr 2009
Posts: 188

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although I don't practice as much as I should, I'm a big fan of yoga as a compliment to windsurfing. Windsurfing is mostly about pulling motions where the muscles are contracting. Yoga tends to give preference to pushing motions where the muscles are elongating. It just makes sense to me tha us old fart windsurfers really need a good stretch more than anything else to balance us out. Not to mention the fact that yoga is great for balance and core strength.
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ronm41 wrote:
My goal is to weigh around 185 to start ski season.

I'd think the more important factors would be strength and endurance, regardless of what the scale says. Much also depends on what mix of muscle vs fat you lost. A good sports nutrition book (or trainer) can make sure your diet promotes muscle preservation and development and discourages fat replacement, but it's very tough to walk the tightrope between the former and the latter. The competitive bodybuilders in my gym eat and lift to put on pounds of muscle regardless of the accompanying fat, then drop the carbs to near zip to starve the fat off ... effective, but overall not a healthy process.

I bumped my proteins this past year with very rewarding muscle retention results compared to previous years. Hard work + insufficient protein = muscle atrophy.
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isobras



Joined: 17 Jul 2012
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xander.arch wrote:
I'm a big fan of yoga as a compliment to windsurfing. Windsurfing is mostly about pulling motions where the muscles are contracting. Yoga tends to give preference to pushing motions where the muscles are elongating. It just makes sense to me tha us old fart windsurfers really need a good stretch more than anything else to balance us out. Not to mention the fact that yoga is great for balance and core strength.

The only thing a muscle can do is contract. It's just an electric rope, and can't push. If you Google yoga elongation myth hype, you may be surprised. But as long as you're not getting injured or to loose (both common w/yoga), what the heck? Have you ever considered adding or morphing to Pilates?
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